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Planting Seeds for Student Success (GSCA 2018 Annual Conference)

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Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Ballroom C
Presenter Name(s)
Kristin Moffett (Elementary School Counselor)
Megan Nellen, (Former Elementary School Principal/Educational Consultant)
Target Audience
Elementary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

Participants will hear how an elementary school leadership team in an independent school in Cobb County worked alongside a family with a transgender child and developed a structure to serve transgender children in the school community. Kristin Moffett and Megan Nellen will address the language created, strategies used, and educational opportunities provided to assist the student (and members of the student/parent/teacher/community) as our preschool student transitioned from a boy to living life as a girl. 

Description
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Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
New Research
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Mrs. Megan Nellen, Masters in Ed. Leadership, Confluence Educational Consulting, LLC
Kristin Moffett, Ed.S., The Walker School
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Room 306
Presenter Name(s)
Michael Keim & Julie Chibbaro
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

Today adolescent male students face additional challenges on the road to adulthood than previous generations, such as internet technology use/abuse.Based on current research and practical experience in both public and all-male private school settings, this presentation will identify major developmental challenges, present effective counseling approaches, and discuss strategies in small groups to promote healthy growth of male students.

Description

This presentation will evaluate current research on adolescent male development, identify challenges to healthy growth and development, such as drug and alcohol use/abuse, internet addictions (i.e., social media, gaming, pornography/sexting, parental separation/incarceration), while addressing strength-based and resiliency approaches to promote healthy pathways to adulthood. The impact of positive peer relationships, adult role modeling and mentoring, and emphasis on high expections of academic success will be discussed. Finally, opportunities for participants to share their experiences in working with this population through small groups will promote understanding and assist in integrating material presented into school counseling programs.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants will be able to:
    • Articulate current challenges to adolescent male development;
    • Discuss counseling strategies used in schols to address challenges to the development of adolescent males; and
    • Integrate strategies into school counseling programs

Learning Objectives:

  • The participant will:
    • Describe current developmental challenges facing adolescent males;
    • Identify strategies for addressing identified challenges; and
    • Formulate polans for integrating counseling strategies presented into school counseling programs.
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academics
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Career Development
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Information Technology
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Room 324
Presenter Name(s)
Jenni Briggs
Michelle Stevens
Target Audience
Elementary
Abstract

Are you tired of the same old, same old lessons? “Uh oh! I have group today!” Does this sound familiar? Do you want to bring some excitement to your school counseling program? Then, we have some ideas to share with you! We will present a handful of engaging core curriculum lessons, some creative as well as productive small group ideas, and a few other fresh components to take your program from “ho-hum” to “SO-FUN!”

Description

Participants will receive some fresh and creative core curriculum lessons and small group lessons related to the academic and personal/social domains. They will learn a variety of engaging and fun ways to present information to students. Participants will be asked to take part in some of the lesson activities for demonstration and participation purposes. Counselors will leave with core curriculum lesson plans that were shared in this session. Some of the topics that will be covered may include, but are not limited to the following: accepting differences, growth mindset, impulse control, generosity, social skills, and class meetings. Additionally, participants will leave with an assortment of fun and engaging activities which can be used in a variety of small counseling groups. The activities will include icebreakers, introductions, group lesson activities and group celebration ideas.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
ASCA Model
Academics
Personal/Social
Presenters
Jenni Briggs, Cobb County School District, Kemp Elementary
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Magnolia B
Presenter Name(s)
Lakisha Bonner, Coordinator, Counseling and Career Development Fayette County
Maria Sherrod, Fayetteville Elementary School Counselor Fayette County
Amanda McCann, Strivven Media, LLC
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Abstract

In elementary school students begin to adopt beliefs about themselves that can define their education and experiences. During those years, there is a huge opportunity to help children and parents become more aware of what can be accomplished at an early age to help a child become prepared for the real world because they are the leaders for tomorrow. Therefore, it is critically important to help our leaders recognize their potential as early as possible.

Description

Elementary school counselors create early awareness, knowledge and skills that lay the foundation for the academic rigor and social development necessary for college and career readiness.  Learn ways to inspire your students by broadening their awareness of future career opportunities. Engage them in the process of exploring careers using interactive, multimedia lessons.  

 

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Issues in Counseling
Career Development
CCRPI
College Readiness
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Magnolia A
Presenter Name(s)
Crystal Holt, Brittany DePlato

Presenters Information
Presenter 1: Name * Brittany De Plato
Presenter 1: Email Address * b.deplato@grady.k12.ga.us
Presenter 1: Work Phone * 229-307-1722
Presenter 1: Cell Phone * 229-977-1099
Presenter 1: Educational Background/Professional Training: Ed.S. in School Counseling, Valdosta State University
Presenter 1: Certification/Licensures * LPC, NCC
Presenter 1: Employment Background * Whigham School, Grady County BOE
Presenter 1: Professional Organizations * GSCA, ASCA, LPCA

Presenter 2: Name: Crystal Holt
Presenter 2: Email Address c.holt@grady.k12.ga.us
Presenter 2: Work Phone 229-307-1747
Presenter 2: Cell Phone 229-216-1974
Presenter 2: Educational Background/Professional Training: M.Ed. in Counselor Education, Georgia Southern
Presenter 2: Certification/Licensures NCC
Presenter 2: Employment Background Cairo High School, Grady County BOE
Presenter 2: Professional Organizations GSCA, FSCA, ASCA
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Rural school counselors face many challenges due to their varying roles, responsibilities, and geographical locations. However, school counselors also have the unique opportunity to be change agents in their schools and communities. One factor that must be addressed in order to see the desired success and advocacy is combating the potential for burnout in rural school counselors. Come hear some strategies, suggestions, struggles, and successes!

Description

The uniqueness of school counseling in rural Georgia will be explored through identification and discussion of the challenges faced by rural school counselors, along with the benefits to serving rural communities. Participants will identify the three main struggles and perks for his/her individual setting. Strategies to address the challenges through advocacy and collaboration will be shared before focusing in on the biggest potential challenge to rural school counselors: burnout. In the book, Burnout: The High Cost of High Achievement, author Dr. Herbert Freudenberger, presents the idea of the “over-achiever” syndrome, suggesting that individuals (school counselors) who are the most invested, dedicated, valuable, and successful run the greatest risk for burning out. After establishing what burnout is, and how it differs from compassion fatigue or vicarious trauma, participants will identify character strengths and how to use those strengths as modes for self-care, which is a necessity for rural school counselors. Participants will develop a self-care plan, and have a chance to win one of our “self-care kits.”

 

The audience will participate in think-pair-share style discussions about the challenges, benefits, character strengths, and self-care plans.

 

Handouts will include: the PowerPoint Presentation, a copy of the VIA Classification of Character Strengths and Virtues found at www.viacharacter.org, and a working document for developing the self-care plan.

 

Learning objectives:

Participants will identify and discuss three challenges related to working as rural school counselors.

Participants will identify and discuss three benefits to serving in rural communities.

Participants will identify and discuss five character strengths.

Participants will create means of self-care from the five character strengths.

Participants will develop a self-care plan.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Issues in Counseling
Rural Counselors
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Room 303
Presenter Name(s)
Ms. Ashley Chennault
Ms. Lisa Miller
Ms. Grace Pniewski
Mrs. Chastity Williams
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

Do your students struggle to mediate conflict before it escalates? Do you need more tools in your toolbox to mediate conflicts with collegues and parents? If so, join us in learning about specific methods to proactively minimize conflict before it becomes problematic and reactively manage existing conflict in a positive and effective way. 

Description

Our session will target the following ASCA Mindsets and Behaviors: 

M1. Belief in development of whole self, including a healthy balance of mental, social/emotional and physical well being 

M3. Sense of belonging in the school environment 

B-LS 9. Gather evidence and consider multiple perspectives to make informed decisions

B-SMS 7. Demonstrate effective coping skills when faced with a problem 

B-SS 1. Use effective oral and written communication skills and listening skills 

B-SS 2. Create positive and supportive relationships with other students

B-SS 3. Create relationships with adults that support success 

B-SS 4. Demonstrate empathy 

B-SS 7. Use leadership and teamwork skills to work effectivley in diverse teams

B-SS 8. Demonstrate advocacy skills and ability to assert self, when necessary 

Objectives/Outcomes: To provide attendees with 5 detailed methods to tackle conflict resolution in a kindergarten through eighth grade setting.  

We will have role plays and opportunities for the audience to participate in discussions, ask questions, and collaborate with collegues. Dialogue and  technology participation will be encouraged. 

Our presentation, along with handouts will be provided as a link on the GSCA app and website. 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
ASCA Model
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Ms. Lisa Miller, Centennial Academy
Ms. Ashley Chennault, Centennial Academy
Mrs. Chastity Williams, Centennial Academy
Ms. Grace Pniewski, Centennial Academy
Session Materials
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Ballroom B
Presenter Name(s)
Scarlet C. Brown
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Many students are exposed to traumatic events that often affect learning and/or behavior. More information and specialized strategies are needed to meet the needs of students in today’s schools. This session will provide an overview of the impact of trauma on development, specifically on the brain and learning. In addition, counselors will be equipped with help and hope for fostering bounce and learn strategies to equip students with the skills to succeed.

Description
The session will review research from ACEs study, CDC, GSU Child Welfare Training on Trauma, NCTSN, Trauma & Learning Policy Institute, and additional sources. Tips and handouts on resilience building, de-escalation, calm down spaces, and more will be shared during the presentation. In addition, during the presentation a variety of recommended trauma resources, toolkits, books, websites, videos, and more will be shared to extend participants' trauma-informed knowledge, skills, and practice beyond the session. 
 
Learning Objectives:
  • Develop an understanding of Adverse Childhood Experiences and why educators need to know about ACEs
  • Define and understand effects of trauma
  • Become aware of the impact of trauma on the Brain & Development
  • Explore strategies for getting kids into the Learning Mode
  • Understand how counselors can foster Bounce and Wobble in students
  • Review strategies for Self-Care

Door prizes consisting of trauma resources (up to 10) will be provided during the training.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
New Research
Social Emotional Learning
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Grand Salon
Presenter Name(s)
Name: Jennifer Bywaters
Presenter: jbywaters@gaca.connectionsacademy.org
Presenter: 678-674-5808
Presenter:770-584-2634
B.A. in Mathematics, M.Ed in Educational Administration. Leadership certificate. Former high school math teacher, current graduation coach. RAMP award winning school 2018

Name: Sara Tran
Email Address: stran@gaca.connectionsacademy.org
Work Phone: 678.744.6741
Cell Phone: 678.525.7903
Educational Background/Professional Training: M.Ed Professional School Counseling
Certification/Licensures* SRS School Counseling P-12
Employment Background: Head High School Counselor, Georgia Connections Academy, 6 years
Professional Organizations: GSCA and ASCA member
Honors/Awards; School Counselor of the Year at Georgia Connections Academy: 2016-2017, RAMP Award Winning School 2018
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Abstract

Struggling students are often difficult to reach. They often appear lazy, defiant, and defensive when they are actually frustrated, overwhelmed, and feeling helpless, unintelligent, and alone. They build walls to hide the real issues. We will discuss how to include teachers, administrators and parents to break through these walls and help them overcome their struggles.  You will leave with handouts with strategies to implement in your school.

Description

Struggling students are often difficult to reach. On the surface they often appear lazy, indifferent, defiant, and defensive when they are underneath they are actually frustrated, overwhelmed, and feeling helpless, unintelligent, and alone. They build walls to hide these issues. We will discuss how to break through these walls to discover the real issues and how to help them overcome.

Often teachers who who work daily these student will sometimes be very hesitant to work with you to help these students.  Certain teachers can be unyielding and unsympathetic. These students inadvertently become identified/stereotyped by their behaviors and often miss out on the real help they need as a consequence.  This session will address getting teacher and administration buy-in to work with you to help the student, which can often be half of the challenge.

This session will address how to make real connections with these students to prevent them from falling through the cracks.  Through Student Success Session which involve administrators, the graduation coach, counselors, parents and students, we collaborate to develop a plan to ensure each individual student’s academic success. These sessions allow families to experience group instruction, individual instruction, and individual meetings with counselors.  Students complete a Student Success Contract before leaving that helps identify barriers and how they plan to overcome them.

Participants will leave the session with handouts of strategies, resources, and ideas to use in each of their unique school environments.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Academics
Personal/Social
Academic Achievement
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Room 308
Presenter Name(s)
Barbara Truluck, M.Ed., NCC
Palmer Middle School, Kennesaw, GA
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

The impact of the stress and anxiety epidemic among students is felt in all areas of the school experience. It interferes with learning for students who struggle with staying in class while feeling highly stressed. This small group responsive intervention helps students who were experiencing high stress levels and school anxiety. The purpose is to work with students who need extra support to acquire skills necessary to reduce anxiety and help build resiliency. 

 

Description

The impact of the stress and anxiety epidemic among students is felt in all areas of the school experience. It clearly interferes with learning, not only for the students who struggle with staying in class while feeling highly stressed, but for teachers and schools who need to cope with the resulting class disruptions and absenteeism. This small group intervention is formed to help students who were experiencing high stress levels and school anxiety due to social/emotional issues, academic performance, and the demands and stressors of adolescence. The purpose of this responsive small group intervention is to work with students who for a variety of reasons need extra support to acquire skills necessary to reduce school related anxiety and help build resiliency. Small group techniques include play and art therapy, music therapy, stress relieving techniques, relaxation breathing, journaling, and goal setting. Outcome data measures trends in students missing class time and chronic absences from school because of stress related symptoms.  

Learning objectives/outcomes:

Professional School Counselors will learn and practice “Stress Busters” techniques to use with their students in small groups settings. The goal is for students to acquire knowledge in ways to counteract toxic stress, build resiliency, learn techniques to de-escalate anxiety, how to prioritize, mindfulness, and build social connections within the support group.

Audience Participation: 

  1. Brain storm “Good Stress vs. Bad Stress” with elbow partner
  2. Journal stress triggers in our own lives and share
  3. Presenter will guide participants through Mindfulness & Visualization technique activity
  4. Stretching & breathing exercise to relaxation music
  5. Short video on school stress by students
  6. CBT art activity: Vision Boards

ASCA Domain(s), Standard(s), & Competency:  

M1: Belief in development of whole self, including a healthy balance of mental, social/emotional and physical well-being.

M2: Self-confidence in ability to succeed.

M3: Sense of belonging in the school.

M5: Belief in using abilities to their fullest to achieve high-quality results.

B-SMS6: Demonstrate ability to overcome barriers to learning.

B-SMS7: Demonstrate effective coping skills when faces with a problem.

B-SS2: Create positive and supportive relationships with other students.

B-SS3: Create relationships with adults that support success.  

B-SS8: Demonstrate advocacy skills and ability to assert self when necessary.

 

 

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academics
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Room 309
Presenter Name(s)
Fabion Vicks
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

The job of a professional school counselor has evolved over the last 10 years to where we are a proactive position. Our position is looked at as a person who stands in the gap for students with needs assessment data & integration within the three domains. Professional school counselors should have the tools to integrate various forms into their comprehensive program to help meet the needs of students more effectively.

Description

Outcomes: To show counselors how to integrate data and technology into their program to become a comprehensive program.

 

Objective: To show counselors how to integrate different forms of technology into their comprehensive counseling program. This presentation will give counselors an opportunity to see that plethora of tools that are at their disposal to improve their program. 

                  

Audience participation: Pre/posttest on various tools that can be used in counseling programs and if they have presently integrated them.

  1. Pre-test QR code with questions on familiarity on Microsoft/google forms, how to use scheduling in google, or other tools like schedule once, digital newsletter using SWAY or powerpoint.
  2. Posttest will have qr code and gauge what they have learned about digital tools they can utilize in their program.

 

Resources: Digital example (weebly page to show how they can integrate a counseling website to their program). Other resources would be instructions on how to maximize Microsoft tools into their counseling program.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
ASCA Model
Academics
Personal/Social
College Readiness
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Information Technology
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Ballroom A
Presenter Name(s)
Boone L. Benton, Ph.D.
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Abstract

Conflict is a natural part of life for all people. Conflict resolution skills learned through peer mediation is a powerful and effective way to promote and increase emotional intelligence among middle school and high school students – a social/emotional period of time when these skills are needed the most! This presentation will give YOU the tools to develop a peer mediation program, train your student mediators, implement the intervention, and track program effectiveness.

Description

Implementation of Peer Mediator Programs: An Intervention to Promote Emotional Intelligence.

Learning outcome: Participants will be able to implement, train, and sustain a peer mediation program at their school. Documentation forms and mediation steps will be handed out.

  1. Brief history of peer mediation – review types of training models (Group, cadre, student body)
  2. Cadre model of training selected and rationales provided
  3. What is Emotional Intelligence (EI)?  Ways counselors encourage growth in EI among their students. "The awareness of one's emotions, ability to detect emotions in others, and adjust responses for a mutually beneficial outcome.'
  4. Social/Emotional Learning opportunities through peer mediation
  5. Understanding and identifying your individual conflict styles
  6. Conducting a needs assessment to support peer mediation
  7. Selection of student mediators – peer mediators
  8. Implementation of peer mediation training
  9. Review of peer mediation steps
  10. Some common mistakes in peer mediation
  11. Benefit to school counselors
  12. Proper documentation of counseling intervention
  13. Promotion and marketing of your mediation program
  14. Data collection to determine program effectiveness
  15. Role Play - Four participants will volunteer to conduct a role-play for a peer mediation
  16. Wrap up and closing questions.
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Social Emotional Learning
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Room 312
Presenter Name(s)
Cameron Aurandt
Target Audience
Independent
Post-secondary/Admissions
Abstract

You are reaching the end of your master’s program with high hopes for what the future has to offer. You are ready to be a school counselor but what do you do next? What will it be like during your first year as a school counselor on your own? This session will provide graduate students with the opportunity to ask a panel of school counselors about the application process, hiring process, and what to expect in their first couple of years as a school counselor. Graduate students will also be given the chance to talk with other students about their experiences as they begin their journey as a school counselor.

Description

This session will provide graduate students with an opportunity to ask experienced school counselors about what their day to day is like, the interviewing process that they are about to begin, and any other questions that they might want to ask. Planting the seeds for success also applies to our graduate students. We must promote the success of future school counselors by providing them with the information they need to as they enter the field.  Following the session, I will create a handout of the questions and answers that will be emailed to each attendee.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Graduate Students
Presenters
Cameron C Aurandt, Valdosta State University and Georgia School Counselor Association (GSCA)
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Room 310
Presenter Name(s)
Dr. Karen D. Rowland
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Social networking is constantly evolving. With real-time photo and video sharing becoming the big trend that school age students are constantly using. Students are using the virtual world to communicate with one another through Snapchat, Instagram, WhatsApp, Tumblr, Musical.ly, to name a few. This workshop will explore the popular sites that today’s students are flocking to, the reasons for doing so, and how school counselors can be prepared to effectively work with students who use or misuse social media.

Description

In a world of Snapchat, Instagram, WhatsApp, Tumblr and Musical.ly, to name a few; schools are challenged today more than ever before on the effects of students’ constant use of social media! With society practically gone mobile, real-time photo and video sharing is now the big trend that school age children are most excited about. While the use of social media can have many advantages, there are equally many disadvantages some of which have proven to be detrimental, and in some cases life-threatening for students. Bullying, sexual harassment, child pornography, sex trafficking, suicide threats and ideation, health risk challenges, kidnapping, and even murder are some of the many dangers of social media use in students.

It is vitally important for school counselors to be aware and knowledgeable of the social media platforms, how they are being used, and also the effects on those using them and those being used on.

This workshop seeks to accomplish the following learning outcomes for school counselors especially at the middle and high schools.

  1. The 10 most popular social media platforms being used by students.
  2. Benefits and dangers of social media applications for students.
  3. Specific ways that students, particularly teens, use other apps to hide risky apps, usually not sanctioned by their parents or guardians.
  4. Effective school counseling techniques for helping students understand the dangers or misuse of social media.
  5. Helpful tips for school counselors to provide to parents on guiding their children in using social media safely.

 

The workshop will also provide some level of interaction and discussion with the presenter and the audience. Each school counselor will leave with a handout of the presentation as well as any other materials relevant to the topic.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Social Emotional Learning
Information Technology
Session Materials
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Ballroom DE
Presenter Name(s)
Brandi Sabb
Target Audience
Secondary
Abstract

School counselors play a vital role in both helping students make the connection between academic success and postsecondary planning as well as ensuring school success towards the College and Career Ready Performance Index (CCRPI). In this session, participants will explore best practices and resources to maximize college and career readiness through the latest innovations and changes to the SAT Suite of Assessments (SAT, PSAT/NMSQT, PSAT 10 and PSAT 8/9).

Description

Through statewide PSAT/NMSQT administrations for sophomores as well as SAT School Day or PSAT 8/9 opportunities in some districts, Georgia middle and high school students have FREE access to resources and tools such as Khan Academy, AP Potential, Big Future, and Roadmap to Careers.

Participants will explore ways to maximize FREE College Board resources, programs and initiatives to ensure college and career readiness for students.

This will be an interactive session designed to propel best practices and habits of mind support. An electronic toolkit will be provided.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Career Development
CCRPI
College Readiness
Academic Achievement
Presenters
Cale Golden, College Board
Brandi Sabb, The College Board
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Magnolia CD
Presenter Name(s)
Markita Grant
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

Attend this session to learn about the resources available within the Georgia Career Information System (GCIS) and GCIS administration tools. GCIS is a college and career-readiness online program. GCIS provides current, comprehensive information and is proud to be a statewide resource managed by the Georgia Career Information Center at Georgia State University. GCIS is available to EVERY public middle and high school in the state of Georgia at no cost.

Description

During this session, participants will:
 
• Increase their knowledge of use to locate relevant career clusters, occupations, pathways, programs of study, US and Georgia schools; and financial aid opportunities
• Simulate the steps used to access activities, curriculum, and lesson plans
• Understand state reporting and how GCIS provides real time tracking for your students success
• Gain clarity on how you and your students log on to SLDS to access GCIS to get started
• Leave with resources to help you jump start your action plan

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Academics
Rural Counselors
CCRPI
Information Technology
Presenters
Ms Markita J Grant, Georgia State University