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Planting Seeds for Student Success (GSCA 2018 Annual Conference)

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Wed 7 Nov, 2018 13:00–14:15, Room 312
Presenter Name(s)
Angel Hall, Ciera McKinnon, and Cameron Aurandt
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Have you been impacted by a crisis in your school during your time as a school counselor? Are you prepared for when a school crisis happens at your school? Today, we are seeing school crisis on the media more and more. As school counselors, we must know our roles in the prevention and intervention of crisis at our schools. In this presentation, we will discuss the creation of a crisis intervention plan and what types of interventions can be implemented following crisis. Participants will be given a checklist that can be used to evaluate their crisis plans at their school.

 

Description

The objective for this session is that all school counselors who attend are able to see the importance of having a crisis team in their schools and a crisis intervention plan. Although each of us hope to never have crisis within our schools, we must be prepared for chance that our schools do experience crisis. Another objective for this session is to inform the audience of ways to learn how to assess their crisis plan at their school. The session will also implement a better understanding of what theory or therapy that can be applied during a crisis. The school counselors in attendance will be able to recognize the necessary assets for a school crisis plan to be effective. It will provide opportunities for those attendees to hear what other schools are doing in their efforts of crisis prevention and intervention. With hopes of developing an effective crisis plan at their school, the school counselors will obtain useful tools and information that could possibly improve their crisis experiences.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Issues in Counseling
Presenters
Ciera McKinnon, VSU Graduate Student
Cameron C Aurandt, Valdosta State University and Georgia School Counselor Association (GSCA)
Angel Hall, Valdosta State University and GSCA
Wed 7 Nov, 2018 13:00–14:15, Magnolia B
Presenter Name(s)
Natalie Edirmanasinghe
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

Participatory Action Research (PAR) is a research method where those affected by the problem are the ones who conduct the research. It can be used to teach students how to investigate issues in their own community and use their voice for solutions. The audience will learn about the #CHICAS and how they use PAR to learn more about the needs of Latinas at their school.  Benefits of PAR use with underserved populations will be discussed

Description

Learning Objectives: 

Upon completion of the session, audience members will be able to: 

-Define Participatory Action Research

-Identify the benefits of using PAR to investigate needs in the school

-Identify the benefits of PAR in working with underserved or underrepresented populations

The presenter will explain what PAR is and how it would be used in schools by outlining a program called the #CHICAS that she conducts in her school. She will discuss the benefits of PAR for the school and the students. The outline of the #CHICAS will include the following: 

-Description of #CHICAS

-How it started, identifying the need

-Additional resources used in the program (i.e., professors from universities, visits to surrounding colleges, participation in discussions involving other community needs)

--Mindsets and Behaviors that align with the use of PAR

--Connection to Science needs

The presenter will leave time for the audience to ask questions and to discuss their comfort with using this intervention with their populations. 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
New Research
Career Development
College Readiness
Presenters
Natalie Edirmanasinghe, Gwinnett County Public Schools
Wed 7 Nov, 2018 13:00–14:15, Room 306
Presenter Name(s)
Shaketha Blankenship, Ph.D, LPC, NCC
Tamila Jackson-Whitaker, Ed.S
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Restorative justice is an emerging approach in school counseling. As an alternative to punitive methods, restorative justice represent an attempt to reform school discipline and improve relationships among stakeholders. The purpose of the presentation is to provide an overview of restorative justice in schools, benefits of restoring relationships that have been damaged, and implementation of restorative approaches to transform student behavior and build healthy school communities.

Description

Restorative justice is an emerging approach in school counseling. As an alternative to punitive methods, restorative justice represent an attempt to reform school discipline and improve relationships among stakeholders. The purpose of the presentation is to provide an overview of restorative justice in schools, benefits of restoring relationships that have been damaged, and implementation of restorative approaches to transform student behavior and build healthy school communities.

 Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the core principles of restorative justice and how they differ from traditional discipline approaches
  • Identify strategies and resources of restorative justice
  • Implement restorative practicies in individual counseling, small group, & classrooom guidance

Opportunities for Participation:

Throughout the session, presenters will provide traditional discipline and restorative justice scenarios allowing discussion and dialogue. Participants will also have opportunities to share strategies. Participants will be provided with resources for best practices of implementing and maintaining restorative justice.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Tamila Jackson-Whitaker, Ed.S, Atlanta Public Schools
Shaketha Blankenship, Ph.D, LPC, NCC, NCSC, Atlanta Public Schools
Wed 7 Nov, 2018 13:00–14:15, Magnolia C
Presenter Name(s)
Diana Virgil, Ed.S.
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Don't we all wish our students could have a "dose of reality" sometimes?  The reality fair is an interactive event that allows students to make a career choice, have a starting salary based upon their current cumulative GPA, establish a budget, and pay for basic monthly expenses/wants as if they were an adult.  Participants will learn how to establish their own fair to help boost career and academic development in their school.

 

Description

Learning Objective/Outcomes:

The purpose of the reality fair is to encourage students to graduate by describing to them how education attainment can have a correlation to potential earnings.  Many students state various careers that they would like to partake in; however, many students do not understand what is needed to achieve those careers.  Therefore, the following has been established into understanding the objectives for the presentation:

  • Participants will go through a step by step process in understanding how to conduct a reality fair at their school.
  • Participants will learn how to collect pre/post data for the reality fair
  • Participants will understand how GCIS can be combined with the reality fair to bring an interactive scenario to students.
  • Participants will learn how academic and career development can have an effect on student’s personal/social life in post-secondary.   
  • Participants will understand how to involve the community and volunteers for the reality fair.

 

Opportunities for Audience Participation:

  • Participants will be able to go through a very brief mock reality fair in order to understand how the reality fair works.
  • Participants will be able to interact throughout the presentation through an interactive poll.

 

Handouts/Resources Provided for Participants:

  • Participants will be provided a link to materials that they can use at their school to get them started.
  • Participants will be provided a handout that details more information about the reality fair and process.
  • Participants will be provided a link to the presentation.
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academics
Career Development
College Readiness
Academic Achievement
Presenters
Mrs. Diana Virgil, Ed.S., South Effingham Middle School
Wed 7 Nov, 2018 13:00–14:15, Ballroom C
Presenter Name(s)
Keli Carter
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

If you’re looking for more insight on how to identify and use data to improve academic achievement, this presentation is for you.  This session will look at the three types of data with emphasis on why outcome data is so important to our profession and Redesigning School Counseling, an online system that provides counselors with the tools they need to develop a locally appropriate, data-driven and accountable school counseling program that promotes student success.

Description

This session will look at three things – identifying data, using data and tools to manage data.  Case studies will be examined to explore the root cause of issues versus the symptoms, along with ways to identify and analyze the data linked to the issues.  We will also discuss process, perception and outcome data.  Emphasis will be on discussing outcome data since that specific data is critical when it comes to creating results-oriented and data driven programs that promote student success.  The latter part of the session will be used to review Redesigning School Counseling, an online data management tool for school counselors.  Participants will be encouraged to use their laptops to log into the demo site and go through the pages as they are presented.   Participants will be given the opportunity to ask questions and discuss the information that is shared.  The objective of this session is to provide knowledge on how to identify specific challenges that hinder academic achievement and how to use data to target and combat those challenges in order to improve student success while using tools that will make the data collecting process more efficient.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
ASCA Model
Academics
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Graduate Students
Career Development
Academic Achievement
Presenters
Amina Ross, Georgia Cyber Academy
Wed 7 Nov, 2018 13:00–14:15, Magnolia A
Presenter Name(s)
Beth P. Mines, LPC
Dr. Stacy Carr
Target Audience
Elementary
Abstract

Ready-Set-GOAL! is an original program to teach and promote goal-setting toward academic achievement, and has been integral to our school culture for eight years.  Recently, the program was at the center of a doctoral dissertation, and was specfically used to close a reading gap for third graders.  The session will combine information about the program with original research and data about its benefits.  Take aways include an outline of the program, lesson plans, and promotional suggestions.

Description

Eight years ago, the School Counselor at Wells Elementary School began an original motivational program called Ready-Set-GOAL! (RSG!).   The program was designed  to introduce elementary students to goal-setting, and was based on research on motivation and behavior change.  Students in all grades began to set individualized goals which, when met, were rewarded with "book bag bling".

Since its beginning, the program has expanded to teach upper grade students about SMART goals, and to promote increases in math achievement through goal-setting.  Recently, the program caught the eye of doctoral candidate, Stacy Carr, who designed her dissertation reserach about how RSG! could be used to narrow a gap in reading performance for students going from third to fourth grade.  The dissertation also included research pertaining to Edwin Lock's goal setting theory and the phenomena of the "fourth-grade slump", which will also be highlighted in this presentation.

During the presentation, participants will see a review of the development and the growth of RSG! at Wells Elementary School.  They will also understand its impact on students attitudes, and reading and math achievement based on school data, and Dr. Carr's original research.  There will be opportunities for questions from the audience, and attendees will leave with a program outline, ASCA model lesson plans, and promotional ideas for students, parents, and faculty.

Program objectives include:

1) To understand motivational research and how it was used to design the RSG! program.

2) To review data and research collected to measure the outcome of the program on student attitudes and achievement.

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
New Research
Academic Achievement
Wed 7 Nov, 2018 13:00–14:15, Room 308
Presenter Name(s)
Dr. Donna M. Jones, LPC
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Calling all Elementary, Middle and High School Counselors! Does your plate appear full? Does it seem as though there's no room for another task? Of course it does! Creating a counseling advisory committee can assist your school counseling program in more ways than one. Having the ability to share ideas with professionals/stakeholders who possess a myriad of perspectives can be positively overwhelming and rewarding for your school to include teachers, students, parents and administrators alike.

Description

As a result of this workshop, participants will be able to identify the significance of having a counseling advisory committee. We will explore logistics involved that may contribute to a successful counseling advisory. We will discuss the selection process for ideal candidates who possess qualities and characteristics that may be conducive to their school's population. We will analyze concepts/ideas that may contribute to establishing/sustaining meaningful partnerships.

In addition to the learning objectives, this workshop will be interactive and hands on. Participants will receive informative handouts that may be used for future reference.

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
ASCA Model
Academics
Personal/Social
Rural Counselors
Career Development
CCRPI
College Readiness
Academic Achievement
Wed 7 Nov, 2018 13:00–14:15, Room 310
Presenter Name(s)
Rebecca Burkhart
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Abstract

Could the culture at your school be improved? Do you want more teacher buy-in with your school counseling program? Have you ever thought “there’s got to be a better way to track behavior data?” Love Your People is way of implementing  PBIS in a whole-child fashion, allowing everyone to embrace each others’ uniqueness. It’s a mindset shift, encouraging feedback in a kind and loving manner, teaching model behaviors to students and fostering collaboration in a more effective manner, uniting everyone, no matter their role at school.

Description

Attendees will learn about the Love Your People model, a whole-school culturally appropriate "way of life." Discussion is encouraged in this session as we brainstorm how to foster overall positive climate change. Knowledge of PBIS model is helpful but not necessary to get practical info from this session. 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Personal/Social
Social Emotional Learning
Wed 7 Nov, 2018 13:00–14:15, Ballroom B
Presenter Name(s)
Whitney Adams
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

This presentation will highlight how North Forsyth High School addresses academic, personal, social and emotional, as well as college and career needs of students through a comprehensive high school transition program. Information on transition activities, program structure, student leadership, and K-12 vertical alignment will be provided. This session is filled with strategies to increase community engagement, strengthen student leadership, and cultivate an environment that promotes positives connections amongst students, staff, parents, schools, and community stakeholders.

Description

North Forsyth High School is a twice recognized RAMP school. This presentation will discuss the planning, implementation, and data outcomes of the North Forsyth High School comprehensive high school transition program. Each element of the comprehensive high school tranition program will be discussed and a timeline presented. This program will also include strategies to better support the academic as well as social and needs of tier three students from 9th-12th grade. Throughout this presentation, the audience will discover the value of cultivating a K-12 vertical village within a school community in order to promote a culture of academic excellence, social and emotional growth, as well as post-secondary achievement. Social and Emotional Learning will be a primary focus of this presentation as fostering positive connections among students, staff, and community stakeholders is a primary focus of the seven schools that encompass the North Synergy team.

Learning objectives include:

Strategies used by a twice recognized RAMP high school to address the academic, social/emotional, and postsecondary needs of 9th-12th grade students  

Ideas for academic, SEL, and post-scondary interventions

An understanding of the positive impact student leadership groups have on school culture

Strategies to support and connect with Tier 3 students

An understanding of the positive impact academic and SEL vertical alignment has on a school community

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
ASCA Model
Academics
Personal/Social
CCRPI
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Wed 7 Nov, 2018 13:00–14:15, Room 303
Presenter Name(s)
Katharine S. Adams, Ph.D. and Jennifer M. Branscome, Ph.D.
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Students who are unable to effectively regulate emotions associated with anxiety and stress may have difficulty making it through the regular school day. This program describes emotional dysregulation and offers practical strategies to help students recognize, monitor, and manage their emotions in a healthy way.  Easily implemented mindfulness and relaxation techniques are provided to help dysregulated students return to a calm state so that they can go back to class.

Description

Learning Objectives and Associated Content:

1. Participants will demonstrate understanding of prevalence rates for anxiety among students in the United States.

Content will include:
• Prevalence rates for anxiety among children and adolescents in the US.
• Students also experience stress or anxiety but are not diagnosed.

2. Participants will demonstrate understanding of emotional dysregulation including physiological and cognitive symptoms.

Content will include:
• Distinction between fear and anxiety.
• Physiological and cognitive symptoms of anxiety.
• Different triggers or circumstances.
• Define emotional dysregulation and impact on students.

3. Participants will demonstrate understanding of the practice of mindfulness and relaxation training.

Content will include:
• Relaxation training in treating anxiety.
• Define mindfulness and describe uses with children in schools.
• Mindfulness techniques, facilitated by a counselor in session, may be used for helping distressed students calm down so that they may return to class.

4. Participants will be able to apply techniques to help students accurately identify and monitor their feelings.

Content will include:
• Strategies to help students understand and identify the emotions: Feeling stories and media, Color-Your-Life activity 
• Strategies to help students monitor or track their feelings: Thermometer graphic, Mood tracker apps

5. Participants will be able to apply relaxation and mindfulness techniques to help students return to a calm state.

Content will include:
• Belly Breathing Techniques: Stuffed animals, Bubbles, Star breathing, Apps
• Calming Mindfulness and Relaxation Techniques: 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 Grounding Technique; The Raisin Exercise; Body Scan; Progressive Muscle Relaxation

6. Participants will be able to determine what to do when an emotionally dysregulated student can not return to class.

Content will include:
• Notify the parents and/or the school administrators.
• Supply parents or guardians with counseling referrals.

Opportunities for Engagement / Participation:

1. Relevant videos will be used to provide illustrations and examples (e.g., demonstrate the use of mindfulness in the schools, use of media in identifying emotions, illustrate chest breathing versus belly breathing).

2. Participants will have opportunity to participate in progressive muscle relaxation exercise.

Handouts / Resources:

1. Participants will receive handouts of Power Point slides used in program.

2. Participants will receive scripts for mindfulness/relaxation techniques discussed in the program (e.g., Grounding Technique, The Raisin Exercise, Brief Body Scan, Body Scan Mindfulness Exercise, Progressive Muscle Relaxation for Children)

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Dr. Katharine S. Adams, PhD, Valdosta State University
Dr. Jennifer M. Branscome, PhD, Valdosta State University
Wed 7 Nov, 2018 13:00–14:15, Room 313
Presenter Name(s)
Teshia Dula, Ed.S.
Rosemary Aschoff, Ed.S.
Lisa Jackson
Marjorie Shans
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Abstract

Do you find that students interact more with their phone or smart device than the lessons that you want to teach them?   Do you want to engage students in Small Groups, Advisement, and Classroom Lessons?  As Educators, we all know that hands on learning experiences are more likely to engage students and boost comprehension! Participants will leave Engage Me!  with tools that will help spark student’s critical thinking, encourage communication, develop collaboration, and ignite engagement!

 

Description

Engage Me!

 At the end of the session participants will :

  1. Understand the engagement gap and how it impacts achievement
  2. Recognize the benefits of hand-on learning
  3. Appreciate how school counselors can use engagement for use in small groups, advisement, and classroom lessons

 The session participants will communicate, collaborate, and engage in hands-on learning activities.  Participants will leave with a packet of easy and “ready to use” activities.

 

 

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academics
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Mrs Teshia Stovall Dula, Ed.S., GCPS
Wed 7 Nov, 2018 13:00–14:15, Ballroom E
Presenter Name(s)
Daphene Blackmon
Target Audience
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Post-secondary/Admissions
Abstract

How much time do you spend looking for the test scores a student needs to receive college credit for AP, IB, etc.?  Are your dual enrollment students preparing for the next step after high school, planning toward a college degree?  Do you want to be more effective and efficient in helping these students? GATRACS can help you provide the information needed to students helping them make the best decisions toward obtaining a college degree.

Description

GATRACS (Georgia Transfer Articulation Cooperative Services) program has multiple tools that can help counselors in advising students who are looking to receive college credit for courses taken in high school and dual enrollment students.  This presentation will go over each of these tools (Exam to College Course Credit website, GATRACS Transfer Portal, GATRACS website) and the support we can offer to counselors in helping their students.

In an ever increasing push to have college credit before high school graduation, counselors need tools and support to help students make informed, purposeful decisions while in high school toward degree completion. After this presentation, counselors will have additional tools in their belt to save time while giving students more information and advice on college credit opportunities.  The counselors will be able to empower students to take their college career in their own hands and plan their path toward degree completion.

This will be an interactive presentation with audience participation.  Handouts will be given and resources distributed to participants.

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Issues in Counseling
College Readiness
Academic Achievement
Information Technology
Wed 7 Nov, 2018 13:00–14:15, Ballroom A
Presenter Name(s)
Jessica Evans
Dr. Valerie Jackson
Melissa Smith
Ashley Allen
Traci Bennett
Holly Hamlin
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

This session will show how counselors can use Google products to make all aspects of a comprehensive school counseling program easier to manage. Counselors from all grade spans will explain what products work best in their setting and how technology can aid in improving the student/counselor relationship. 

Description

Counselors will learn how to use the products below and given time to explore unfamiliar products. A copy of the presentation will be given to attendants via the Google Classroom. 

    • GMail
    • Sheets
    • Slides
    • Docs
    • Classroom
    • Drive
    • YouTube
    • Play
    • Hangouts
    • Voice
    • Interland
    • Translate
    • Sites 

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Information Technology
Presenters
Valerie Jackson
Wed 7 Nov, 2018 13:00–14:15, Room 309
Presenter Name(s)
Gail Smith
Jennifer Diaz
Matthew Gambill
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Post-secondary/Admissions
Abstract

Advocating for our profession means actively and consistently promoting school counseling to all stakeholders in order to increase access to comprehensive school counseling programs for all students. This can sometimes seem to be an insurmountable task above and beyond our job descriptions. Come join us to learn what advocacy actually looks like and how to contribute at the local, community, state and national level. Legislative initiatives from the previous and the upcoming session will be discussed so that you can be informed about issues affecting our students. You will walk away from this session armed with the knowledge and confidence to be more involved and make a greater impact as a school counselor.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
ASCA Model
Issues in Counseling
Presenters
Ms Gail Smith
Wed 7 Nov, 2018 13:00–14:15, Room 324
Presenter Name(s)
TeShaunda Hannor-Walker
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

Supervisors building a trusting relationship with supervisees is an important role of supervision. The Supervisor-supervisee relationship should be developmental, safe for self-exploration, and transformational (Johnson, Skinner, & Kaskow, 2014). Often supervisees participate in practicum and internship with personal and professional issues that can make supervising them a little more challenging. This workshop is designed to help supervisors better identify and work through supervisee confidence and competence issues without jeopardizing the supervisor-supervisee relationship. 

 

Description

Supervision can be an overwhelming and rewarding experience. Whether one is supervising trainees for school counseling, clinical practice, or the corporate sector, the fundamental aspects of the role remain unscathed. Each supervisor-whether veteran or a novice- aspires to bring out the best qualities of a trainee for the benefit of the client. Supervision is the venue where trainees enhance their skills, improve self-efficacy, and demonstrate autonomy and leadership, which makes the supervisor's role so critical. While trainees come with a level of skills and knowledge, they also present with other challenges that can make the supervisor-supervisee relationship more complex. Effective supervisors seek ways to weave through these delicate hurdles by providing professional development, developing the trainee’s knowledge, skills, and attitude while also safeguarding client welfare and promoting ethical practice (Johnson, Skinner, & Kaslow, 2014). Managing all these dynamics can seem problematic. However with the right framework and structure, supervisors can provide an excellent and transformational supervision experience. This workshop is designed to discuss the most prevalent needs, concerns, and stressors that occur within the supervisor-supervisee relationship and to provide interventions, strategies, and practical ways to build confidence in supervisee as they work through personal and professional curves in counseling. This presentation will be fun and interactive. Participants will receive didactic instruction and discuss case studies in small groups. Handouts will include strategies for school counseling, clinical, or corporate supervisors.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn the key factors to effective supervision and avoid the pitfalls that can impact the supervisory relationship.
  2. Participants will learn best-practice supervision models, interventions and strategies for working with supervisees who face personal and professional obstacles while promoting ethical practice.
  3. Participants will learn the framework and structure that leads to a more transformational supervision approach as oppose to a transactional one.  

Johnson, W. B., Skinner, C. J. and Kaslow, N. J. (2014), Relational Mentoring in Clinical Supervision: The Transformational Supervisor. J. Clin. Psychol., 70: 1073-1081. doi:10.1002/jclp.22128

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Issues in Counseling
Career Development
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Room 303
Presenter Name(s)
Merrill Baxley
Jennifer Diaz
Ginny Wages
Robin Zorn
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Abstract

This presentation will include activities to support your program goals in the academic, personal/social, and career domains.

Description

You have analyzed your school’s data, created SMART goals, and presented them to your stakeholders, now what?  This practical, engaging, and FUN session will feature activities, children’s literature, props, and ideas to support your program goals in the three domains. Come learn about Mindfulness, STEM and Project Based Learning Activities, Academic Coaching, Study Skills, Attendance Incentives, Career Weeks, PBIS, and more.  These ideas can be used in small groups, core curriculum lessons, or developed into your school counseling comprehensive program.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academics
Personal/Social
Career Development
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Room 309
Presenter Name(s)
Myesha Davis, Professional School Counselor, Lovinggood Middle School, Cobb County School District
Dawn Mann, Program Manager for Career Guidance and Counseling, Georgia Department of Education
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Senate Bill 401 requires that all students in grades eight through twelve take an aptitude assessement. Participants will learn how YouScience satisfies the career interest and career aptitude requirements of the BRIDGE Bill. Additionally, presenters will cover available reports, YouScience implementation strategies, and options to leverage the YouScience results.

Description

In the Spring 2018 legislative session, legislatures passed Senate Bill 401 which added new language regarding required career-readiness activities. Specifically the bill requires that students take not only a career interest inventory, but also a career aptitude assessment.

School Counselors looking for an innovative way to engage their students and uncover their unique abilities can use YouScience. YouScience is a career interest and aptitude assessment that is free to all Georgia Public High Schools. YouScience uses brain games to produce career options that are based on interests and natural abilities.

  • Participants will learn the career-readiness requirements for Senate Bill 401
  • Participants will know how to use YouScience to satisfy the new BRIDGE Bill requirements

Small group collaboration. We will have handouts and participants will receive access to the presentation.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Career Development
Presenters
Dawn Mann, Georgia Department of Education
Ms Myesha Davis, Georgia School Counselor Association (GSCA)
Session Materials
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Room 312
Presenter Name(s)
Ruth Blackstock
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Abstract

Transition from one level of school to another is a critical time for all students but especially those who are at risk for one reason or another.  Small groups can help address this anxiety by methodically examining the different challenges brought by the change, the similarities in education that will continue, and the skills that will help them most to embrace the change and growth. 

Description

This program will touch on relevant research done regarding small group interventions to prepare students for change from elementary to middle school.  It will propose a model and curriculum for small group sessions that were carried out in a 5th grade setting with a variety of students. Models from the small group will be available for review, as well as the measured results of a small drop of anxiety among the participants.  Handouts of the curriculum will be given.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academics
Personal/Social
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Ballroom C
Presenter Name(s)
Dr. Cedric Cooks, LPC, NCC, NCSC
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

We have read and heard the grim statistics that surround the educational experience of African American students, particularly that of males. The achievement gap that continues to exist among African American students has created a sense of urgency among educators to incorporate social justice principles into their everyday practice as a means to eradicate educational inequalties. Changing the educational narrative of African American students requires increased cultural competence, lowered discipline infractions and family/community involvement.

Description

Advocacy is not always popular and often time it is met with some resistance, yet in the field of education, advocacy is necessary for the acadmic success of many of our students, espcially students of color. Though we know that social justice and advocating for marginalized groups is of high importance, counselors still struggle or don't feel quite comfortable or competent enough in tackling issues that systemically impact students who experience huge disparities in the education setting. 

1. Participants in this session will learn common disparities that are present in the education setting that hinder the academic success of African American students.

2. Participants in this session will learn how to assist faculty and staff in developing cultural competence/sensitivity or increasing their cultural competence/sensitivity when working with African American students.

3. Particpants in this session will learn about community resources and programs that can help support their work with African American students and their families.

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academics
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Academic Achievement
Presenters
Cedric Cooks, Norcross High School
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Room 306
Presenter Name(s)
Laura Ross
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

As educators we know that connecting with students is essential to their overall success. Research and literature supports the importance of school connectedness. So, how do we make these connections with all students? Discover how one staff uses a school-wide initiative of simple strategies, support programs, and intentional conversations  to focus on making teacher-student connections and engaging ALL students.

Description

As educators, we know that connecting with students is an essential foundation to their overall success. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs lists “belongingness and love” as a need before one can reach achievement, respect, and problem solving. The Search Institute lists a “caring school climate” where students have positive and encouraging relationships with teachers as one of their “40 Developmental Assets” for all age groups. The Center for Disease Control tells us that students who feel connected at school are more likely to achieve academically and less likely to engage in risky behaviors. Neurobiology research tells us that human beings are hardwired to connect. So, how do we make these connections throughout our schools impacting all students? Discover how one staff uses a school-wide initiative of simple strategies, support programs, and intentional conversations  to focus on making teacher-student connections and engaging ALL students. This session will include a review of information and research that supports the importance of school connectedness, one counselor’s real world experience that shows the need of finding connections in school, an overview of a successful school wide connections initiative, practical ideas of initiating connections with students and next steps for building stronger school connectedness. Participants will be given a link and QR Code to a Google file with all the information from the session.

After attending this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Discuss relevant information and research that supports the importance of connections between teachers and students.
  2. Apply practical strategies to build teacher-student connections with individual students
  3. Utilize school connectedness ideas in staff education.
  4. Formulate a connectedness initiative with in their school.
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Academics
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Laura Ross, Five Forks Middle School/ GCPS
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Ballroom B
Presenter Name(s)
Nicohl Shelton Webb
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Are you getting questions about the effectiveness of your school counseling program? Whether you are analyzing process and/or perception data, utilizing technology tools can be a great asset to any school counselor. If you are looking for tools that help you engage students, clarify your role, improve your services offered to students, and track their individual achievement, you’re in luck! If you can’t wait to be presented with tools to help you work more efficiently and provide you with immediate data, then join this session and get ready to make data-informed decisions about your school counseling program!

Description

At the conclusion of this lesson, the learner will be able have a toolbox of technology applications that will allow them to analyze different types of data needed in order to have a comprehensive school counseling program. Often times we are asked, “How can data help us improve our counseling programs and the services we provide to students?” It has now become more common for school counselors to collect data to develop an accurate and efficient system to track their day-to day-activities. Using simple and free technology tools such as Google Forms, Kahoot, Plickers, Quizizz, Poll Everywhere, Flipgrid and Nearpod, students and counselors will receive immediate data and be able to easily analyze how services can be shaped around the needs of the students.

 

At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

  • understand the basics of the various technology tools listed above and how to infuse them into your school counseling program.
  • understand the role of data collection in school counseling and how this is key to defining the school counselor’s role.
  • understand that data collection provides written documentation that can be revisited to assess quality work and provide for self-reflection about the job.
  • understand that the results of data can be utilized to determine the needs of the counseling department, to determine an effective lesson and result in an understanding of the beliefs, values and ideas of the school counselors.

The presenter will model specific technology applications and tell the learner how they can be applied within their school counseling program. Short video clips will be used to model some of the applications presented. The audience will participate by earning prizes for downloading and using certain apps. Handouts will be minimal, but participants will be given a QR code with a link of the complete presentation and a listed description, with videos included, of how to use each technology tool featured.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
ASCA Model
Academics
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
College Readiness
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Information Technology
Presenters
Nicohl Shelton Webb, Pate's Creek Elementary
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Magnolia CD
Presenter Name(s)
Christy Conley- Public Counselor, North Oconee High School
Brandi Smith- College Advisor, Marietta Public Schools
Target Audience
Secondary
Post-secondary/Admissions
Abstract

This will be an interactive session that will provide audience members with perspectives and advice from counselors in a public high school setting and college admission representatives.  The discussion will focus on college admissions in the 21st centry.   Attendees will walk away with tangible "takeaways" that can be implemented in their school setting and craft their best practices for the college admissions process.

 

Description

This discussion will cover topics ranging:

  • The current and future demographics in the country and how it relates to the college admission process.  
  • How to effectively begin to create and nurture a college going culture.  
  • Importance of creating effective college visits in your high school
  • How to create relationships with the college admission officers that will help shape the landscape of your college admission process
  • Other hidden tips and tricks to "work smarter and not harder".

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Issues in Counseling
College Readiness
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Room 324
Presenter Name(s)
Richard E. Cleveland, PhD, LPC, NCC, ACS
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Despite research regarding clinical effectiveness and increased societal acceptance, students adhering to a Judeo-Christian worldview may be hesitant to engage in mindfulness-based interventions due to perceptions of mindfulness as a strictly Buddhist practice. This session explores a secularized conceptualization of mindfulness and then incorporates a Judeo-Christian framework for framing mindfulness-based interventions.

Description

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  1. Identify the impact of spiritual beliefs on clients’ and counselors’ worldviews.
  2. Identify a “secular” definition of mindfulness.
  3. Identify potential mindfulness-based interventions relevant for clients espousing a Judeo-Christian worldview.

This session will be interactive in nature as presenters will invite participant perceptions and experiences in a constructive dialogue. Session will begin by recognizing that in addition to counseling professional and ethical standards (i.e., ACA, 2014; ASCA, 2016; ASERVIC, n.d.; CACREP, 2016), research and literature highlight the importance of recognizing both clients’ and counselors’ spiritual/religious values within the counseling setting (Morrison, Clutter, Pritchett, & Demmitt, 2009). The presenters suggest however, that clients espousing a Judeo-Christian worldview may have reservations about the counseling environment (Belaire, Young, & Elder, 2005; Ford & Garzon, 2017) especially when unsure of the counselor’s religious/spiritual values. Furthermore, clients adhering to a Judeo-Christian worldview may be hesitant to engage in mindfulness-based interventions despite their effectiveness (Stratton, 2015) perceiving mindfulness as a strictly Buddhist religious practice. These factors are arguably more prevalent when working with student-client populations in the P-12 setting given the power differential between students and adults.

The session will present a “secularized” definition of mindfulness drawn from relevant literature (Gage, 2003; Gehart & McCollum; Kabat-Zinn, 2005; Langer, 2009; Nanda, 2010), which demonstrates both conceptual fidelity and integration to multiple worldviews. Presenters will then articulate a framework aligned with a Judeo-Christian worldview for implementing mindfulness-based interventions. Suggested practices and approaches will be presented and participants will be invited to process session content together through dialogue. After this time of sharing and processing, the session will close with presenters welcoming participants’ questions.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Richard E Cleveland, PhD, LPC, NCC, ACS, Georgia Southern University
Jared Simonin, Georgia Southern University
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Grand Salon
Presenter Name(s)
Robert Rice, Navina Vemuri, Sarah Connelly, and Alan Pendrick.
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

Motivational Interviewing (MI): A Beneficial Skill for School Counselors. In this session, attendees will discover the benefits of Motivational Interviewing (MI) applications for school counselors who face resistant students, ambivalent parents and challenging teachers. MI skills for supporting positive change will be exhibited in this experiential presentation. Presenters will explain aspects of MI, demonstrate MI in action, and discuss effective usage in the school setting. Resources for using and learning MI will be provided

Description

Description

Parents, teachers, and students often find it difficult to trust school personnel and as a result are often resistant to interventions and movement to positive change (Reinke, et al., 2011). Working with students who are self-injurious, disruptive, or disengaged can be difficult and stressful for school counselors. Planting seeds is made even harder when students are stuck and confused. Even in conferences that are designed to help students move toward success, difficulties can arise when the adults are ambivalent or confrontational (Brigman, Mullis, Webb, & White, 2005). Equipping school counselors with MI skills may help school counselors see more success with difficult populations.

 

Researchers have found Motivational Interviewing (MI) can provide an effective method for reaching this population and moving them towards change. If school counselors have mastered basic counseling skills, use compassion, and employ MI skills, they can learn motivational skills that will enhance their practice (Frey, et al., 2013; Frey, Sims, & Alvarez, 2013; Atkinson & Woods, 2003). Motivational interviewing can aid in working with disaffected students and perplexing consultations with adults by helping them clarify goals, commit to interventions, and sustain follow-through (Herman, et. al., 2014; Miller & Rollnick, 2013; Naar-King & Suarez, 2011).

 

Through a PowerPoint slide show, role play demonstrations, group discussions, and handouts/resources, participants will learn about motivational interviewing applications in school settings.  Participants will learn how Motivational Interviewing (MI) can assist school counselors when working students, teachers, and parents who are resistant or ambivalent to change or simply stuck. Participants will examine the use of: the MI RULES, MI Spirit, OARS, and MI fundamental strategies that can be used in schools. After this session, participants will be able to identify ways to blend MI with other intervention models (to include individual sessions, consultations and RTI).

 

Learning Objectives

Participants will:

  • discover how MI can aid in establishing a collaborative relationship with teachers, parents, or students.
  • gain insights into the basic skills of MI: the MI spirit, the rules of MI, and OARS.
  • recognize the fundamental MI processes and strategies for removing barriers to change.
  • learn a new way of removing the barriers to change and motivation when working with parents and teachers in the consultation model.
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Academics
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
College Readiness
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Navina Vemuri, M.Ed School Counseling, Chattahoochee High School-Fulton County
Sarah Connelly, M/ED School Counseling, Dickerson Middle School - Cobb County
Julian Pendrick, M.Ed School Counseling, Chattachoochee Elementary-Forsyth County
Robert E. Rice, Ph D, Georgia State University
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Room 310
Presenter Name(s)
Tonya Dedeaux and McKenzie Lawson
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

School counselors recognize that there is often a stigma that surrounds mental health issues as well as how that stigma is a hindrance to so many students as they seek support and assistance. Participants will have the opportunity to learn about ways to “stop the stigma and start the conversation” about mental health awareness through student-lead, school-wide programming.

Description

My Mind Matters (or M3) is a student-led mental health awareness initiative started at Woodward Academy. The stigma that surrounds mental health is paralyzing to teens who need help. As we know, teen mental health concerns are becoming continually more prevalent, which creates great barriers to their academic and personal success when left untreated. It is important they our students are empowered and educated to seek the assistance they need as well as help their friends. M3 was started in an attempt to normalize the conversation around mental health on our campus.

M3 is planned and executed by a student board comprised of upperclassmen. This board is facilitated by two school counselors. Under the board, there are three operating committees: Events, Community Outreach, and Advertising.  An application process is implemented to select members for our various committees, each led by student board members. The board and their committees meet weekly to plan our programming. Since students know best how to engage their peers, their leadership is very important to the success of this initiative.

Year-long planning culminates with “M3 Week” during Spring semester. The typical structure of the week is that each day there is a mental condition that is highlighted. Students use the school tv broadcast system, lunch-n-learns, assemblies, and classroom lessons to educate students on various mental conditions. Subsequently, each day during common lunch hour, additional activities are planned for the entire student body. Some examples of activities are therapy dog visits, therapeutic drumming, painting and journaling, a silent disco, and yoga. We have also had speakers, such as Kevin Hines, as well as documentary screenings, like Angst: Raising Awareness Around Anxiety.

During this session, attendees will learn about how to implement an M3 Student Committee and plan and execute school-wide programming around mental health awareness. We will begin with an “ice breaker” activity, “When I say ___________, I really mean…”, that highlights the importance of using appropriate language when expressing mental distress to avoid contributing to the stigma surrounding mental illness. Next, in a short presentation, we will provide an overview of our committee structure/development, program planning, implementation, and evaluation. We will end the presentation with a game show activity we do during our M3 Week. In conclusion, we would like to provide time for questions and small group brainstorming. While our programming is adaptable regardless of level or classification, we want participants to walk away confident and excited about implementing a mental health awareness initiative that fits their school.

Learning Objectives

  1. Audience will learn how to engage students in mental health awareness programming in school.
  2. Audience will learn how to plan and execute mental health programming in their school
  3. Audience will learn how to utilize a student committee to carry out the activities of mental health awareness.

Session Outcomes

  1. Participants will walk away with sample activities that can serve as a blueprint for a mental health awareness week program.
  2. Participants will learn how to incorporate students into school counseling outreach.

Opportunities for Audience Participation

  •  game show
  • “When I say I’m___________” activity
  •  group brainstorming

 

Handouts/Resources

  • Outline of a sample My Mind Matters Week
  • Programming post-test/survey
  • Sample marketing materials
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
ASCA Model
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Tonya Dedeaux, Woodward Academy
McKenzie Lawson, Woodward Academy
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Magnolia B
Presenter Name(s)
Dwayne Hobbs
Target Audience
Secondary
Abstract

This session is designed for high school counselors who want to understand the standards, guidelines, operating procedures, and requirements for the WBL program.  Successes will be shared along with statistics and current challenges. Find out how you can help make the program in your school be the best it can be.  

Description

This session is designed for high school counselors who want to understand the standards, guidelines, operating procedures, and requirements for the WBL program. Successes will be shared along with statistics and current challenges. Find out how you can help make the program in your school be the best it can be.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
College Readiness
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Room 308
Presenter Name(s)
Sarah Kitchens
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

This presentation focuses on the impact of poverty on student achievement and steps school counselors can take to help student’s living in poverty to overcome barriers.

Description

Expected session outcomes: Participants will gain:
1) Knowledge about students living in poverty with information about educational and personal barriers unique to this population
2) Ideas on how to access their bias toward individual living in poverty
3) Ideas on how to become social advocates within their school system
4) Strategies to increase student success with additional ideas how to implement these strategies into established guidance programs.

The goal of this presentation is to provide school counselors with steps to help students overcome the barriers associated with living in poverty.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academics
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Rural Counselors
Academic Achievement
Presenters
Dr. Lacey Ricks, Liberty University
Dr. Teshaunda Hannor-Walker, PhD, LPC, NCC, CPCS, Walker & Hannor-Walker, LLC and Liberty University
Erik Schmitt
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Ballroom DE
Presenter Name(s)
Dr. Tamika Hibbert, Mrs. Keala Edwards-Cooper
Target Audience
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Post-secondary/Admissions
Abstract

The goal of this session is to provide information to Professional School Counselors, Counselor Educators, Supervisors, Counseling Students, College Advisors and Educators concerning the various strategies that can be applied to assist undocumented high school students through the post-secondary process.  Participants will receive information regarding the associated ethical approaches and legal policies.

Description

The audience will be provided with a summary of the current standing of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and the H.R.496 - BRIDGE Act. Topics explored will include: Establishing a high school graduation plan, reviewing the post-secondary options, family group counseling sessions, identifying community based resources and exploring the associated post-secondary options and steps for matriculation. The audience will receive a variety of information that school counselors/ counselor educators can use to identify and support students, parents and guardians in the educational environment who identified as being undocumented. The audience members will also be given the opportunity to ask questions and review the shared information.  The overall objective is to enhance participant’s awareness, enabling partakers to use the information obtained from the session to advocate for undocumented students in the educational setting.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academics
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Graduate Students
Rural Counselors
Career Development
College Readiness
Academic Achievement
Presenters
Tamika Hibbert, Atlanta Public Schools
Mrs. Keala Edwards-Cooper, Atlanta Public Schools
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Magnolia A
Presenter Name(s)
Laura Spencer, LPC
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Under Pressure: 

How much is too much and what can we as counselors do to support our students and parents? Join Ivy Creek Elementary School Counselors and former Mill Creek High School student/current UGA student as we delve into the variying ways students from Elementary through college face pressures and what we as professioanal cousnelors can do to help.

 

Description

We plan to start with burning questions: 

  • Is there a difference between “good pressure” and “bad pressure”?
  • How can I tell when my child is under too much or inappropriate stress?
  • Are kids really experiencing more pressure than I did as a child?
  • Does pressure trickle down from adults to children?

 

 

  • In what ways am I unintentionally placing stress on my child?
  • How can parents know the difference between pushing their children to fulfill their potential vs. overloading/overwhelming them and causing harm unintentionally?
  • Is childhood onset anxiety a real thing?

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1JTLv3Fi8bBJy-DHH3irnEcE2YiJWQcqgaigNDanSD34/edit?usp=sharing

 

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academics
Personal/Social
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Ballroom A
Presenter Name(s)
Dianne Acuña Thompson
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Post-secondary/Admissions
Abstract

At Decatur HS our mindset is Whatever It Takes!  Come learn how The Decatur Student Center was created by using data and student voice to identify & meet student needs beyond the classroom through community collaboration, university partnerships and innovative programming to provide wrap around services for all students.  

Description

The presentation will discuss:

-logistics of designing a center

-how data was transformed into programming

-on-going data collection

-how to collect student voice

Elements of presentation:

-small and large group discussion

-lecture

-experiential learning

-ppt (or prezi)

-handouts

-Q&A

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Academics
Personal/Social
Graduate Students
Career Development
CCRPI
College Readiness
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Information Technology
Presenters
Ms. Dianne Thompson, Ed.S., City Schools of Decatur
Ms. Tamika Mickens, Ed.S., City Schools of Decatur
Ms. Raquel Jones, M.Ed., City Schools of Decatur
Dr Ken Jackson, Decatur HS/UGA
Dr Kimberly Jones, Ed.D., City Schools of Decatur
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 11:15–12:30, Room 309
Presenter Name(s)
Myesha Davis, Professional School Counselor, Lovinggood Middle School, Cobb County School District
Dawn Mann, Program Manager for Career Guidance and Counseling, Georgia Department of Education
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 11:15–12:30, Ballroom C
Presenter Name(s)
Chon Hester
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Post-secondary/Admissions
Abstract

Are you awake? Are you fully consciousness regarding diversity? This session will provide interactive strategies, skills building, and dynamic activities to increase attendees diversity consciousness. Attendees will enhance their knowledge of how to examine and completely understand the relationship between success and diversity consciousness. This session will enhance the attendees knowledge of building relationships and understanding, respecting, and valuing diversity.

Description

This session will provide dynamic interactive strategies and activities to promote diversity consciousness and success with students or conduct effective professional development for staff.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
ASCA Model
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Presenters
Chon Hester, Henry County Schools
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 11:15–12:30, Room 324
Presenter Name(s)
Randy Blackmon
Target Audience
Secondary
Abstract

 Online dual enrollment offers opportunity to for students who cannot get to a campus for face-to-face courses. University System of Georgia eCore provides core college courses available through 21 public colleges and universities in Georgia. Last year over 2,500 eCore courses were taken for dual credit with a historical ABC rate of 91% or 9 out of 10 students earning college credits. Tuition is funded by Georgia Dual Enrollment program.

Description

Information:
University System of Georgia eCore program description, overall enrollments and success rates
Advantage of online option for students, particularly those from rural areas of the state.
Review of research concerning rural students and the effects of county population on college attainment. Discussion of results indicating that rural students, taking eCore for dual credit, had higher success rates than students from more populated counties.
eCore dual student county of origin, highlighted over the past three years, showing coverage across the state.
Learning Outcomes:
Increase appreciation for rural student challenges
Understand dual enrollment and its effects
Realize the potential of online dual enrollment and add viable option for student college preparation
Audience Participation: Open for questions and comments during and after the presentation
Handouts: Brochures for eCore dual enrollment

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Rural Counselors
College Readiness
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 11:15–12:30, Room 303
Presenter Name(s)
Tim Schwarz
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

An experienced special education attorney provides an overview of special education law, including the new Supreme Court decision in Endrew F. Using example conversations, this presentation will break down how federal law applies in common situations, including evaluation, plan drafting, school discipline, and least restrictive environment. In short, this presentation will provide you a checklist on what it takes for special education services to be procedurally and substantively compliant with the law.

Description

Attendees to the presentation will learn:
A) the process for evaluating a child and creating a special education plan;


B) how an IEP is evaluated to determine if it provides a free, appropriate, public education;


C) how to understand and apply procedural rights in special education, such as:


1) Least Restrictive Environment
2) Initial Evaluations, Re-evaluations, and Independent Evaluations at public expense
3) Transition Planning
4) Manifestation and School Discipline;


D) to identify the most important features of a good goal - measurability and individualization

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academics
Personal/Social
Presenters
Tim Schwarz, JD, Law Office of Tim Schwarz
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 11:15–12:30, Room 308
Presenter Name(s)
L. Nicole Ayers, MA, APC, NCC
Co-presenter: Karen D. Rowland, Ph.D., LPC, NCC
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Abstract

The emotional abuse and neglect of children has profound impacts on school success and wellbeing across the lifespan. This session will offer suggestions for advocating for voiceless children in your school who may be impacted by emotional abuse. School counselors are poised to assist in ensuring positive outcomes for children who are abused. Participants will gain a holistic knowledge of the academic implications of emotional abuse, warning signs, and tools to advocate for students.

Description

The emotional abuse and neglect of children has profound impacts on mental health and school performance across the lifespan. This session will offer suggestions for advocating for voiceless children in your school who may be impacted by emotional abuse and neglect. This presentation will provide an overview of the academic implications, lifelong impacts, and societal costs of emotional abuse on developing students. Participants will gain a holistic knowledge of the mental health and academic performance impacts of emotional abuse, the warning signs and symptoms of emotional abuse, and how abuse impacts the brain and other functioning. Participants will gain tools and strategies to advocate for voiceless students and work with families affected by emotional abuse in a school setting. A developmental trauma approach will be used to discuss the costs of emotional abuse to children at the student level, school level, and societal level. Participants will leave empowered and equipped to advocate for the needs of students impacted by emotional abuse. Recommendations and information about current initiatives, funding resources, and involvement will also be discussed.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Presenters
L. Nicole Ayers, MA, APC, NCC, Mercer University
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 11:15–12:30, Room 310
Presenter Name(s)
Lynne Watts
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Learn about personality style and communication that empowers counselors, staff and parents to speak a common language encouraging leadership traits, working in their strengths and growth mindset. DISCover your own personality style and how to create a winning environment at your school. Recognize the secret fuel and communication tips for personality. This session is highly interactive and fun! Includes a template for re-delivering a similar program at your school.

Description

Handling Crucial Conversations through Effective Communication

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will identify their own personality style and learn to recognize the personality styles of others
  2. Participants will learn to recognize the secret fuel and environmental needs for each personality style.
  3. Participants will learn communication tips to create positive crucial conversations with parents and staff.

Discuss World Class Service and Growth Mindset (10 minutes)

  • Quality
  • Speed of delivery
  • Show you care

Introduce DISC personality assessments and basic concepts (5 minutes)

  • Four basic styles
  • No one personality is better than another
  • Everyone is a blend

Divide the Room: (Interactive-20 minutes)

  • Introvert vs Extrovert
  • Task vs. People Focus
  • Strengths vs. Blind Spots
  • We’re all a team

  Crucial conversations and Personality Style (15 minutes)

  • Secret fuel of each personality style
  • Environmental needs of each personality style
  • Strengths and blind spots of each personality style
  • Communication tips 

Pair and Share (Interactive-10 minutes)

  • Work with a partner and identify most difficult personality
  • Identify ways to better communicate with each personality style           

Additional Communication Tips (10minutes)

  • Set an Intention
  • Start with Heart
  • Develop Presence
  • Things to Avoid

Handouts:

  • Crucial Conversation Prep Sheet
  • Cultivate Effective Crucial conversations with DISC
  • Cultivate a Growth Mindset for Behavior Change
  • Tips for Crucial Conversations with DISC Personality Types
  • What is Your Personality Type?
  • Growth Mindset vs. Fixed Mindset Comparison

Total minutes:  75 minutes

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 11:15–12:30, Magnolia B
Presenter Name(s)
Christi A. Runyan, Haralson County High School, College and Career Academy CEO/Asst. Principal
Christy McBride, Bremen High School, CTAE Director and WBL Coordinator
D'Lanna Mason, YouScience, Client Services Manager
Target Audience
Secondary
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Post-secondary/Admissions
Abstract

Learn how high schools in the West Georgia Technical College service area used seniors' YouScience results to partner with local employers, West Georgia Tech, and families to encourage students to take important steps toward securing a plan for post-graduation. At the Future Fair held in June 2018, students had the opportunity to interface with companies, as well as hear about the training and educational needs that can be addressed by West Georgia Tech.

Description

Content: Discussion of how schools partnered with YouScience, local employers and West GA Tech to introduce graduating students to career and education opportunities in their local community. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn best practices for partnering with your local technical college to implement a Future Fair using YouScience results
  • Learn how to use YouScience Analytic tools to identify strong fit careers for students

Audience Participation:

  • Opportunity for audience to ask questions as well as share their own experiences using YouScience results to assist students with post-secondary transitions.

Handouts/Resources:

  • Will share samples of communications to parents and students regarding the Future Fair
  • Will demo YouScience results
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Career Development
College Readiness
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 11:15–12:30, Ballroom DE
Presenter Name(s)
Lauren Hodges and Dr. Dawn Hadley
Target Audience
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

Counselors want to learn the impact of Mental Health Curriculums in the school setting on mental health knowledge and attitudes towards mental health issues. Academic and social pressures have caused a rise in mental health issues and highlight the need to teach mental health awareness at the high school level introducing techniques to facilitate the development of social-emotional wellness, such as stress management and resilience. 

Description

Adolescence is a time where students are making changes to their identities and personalities that may lead to physiological changes related to stress, anxiety, and depression (Emamjomeh & Bahrami, 2015). The latter impacts the student’s education because these physiological changes can lead to damaging consequences in socialization, communication, and physical health (Emamjomeh & Bahrami, 2015). This is further backed by information cited by Butzer et al. (2016) that indicates adolescents lead psychiatric issues found in the USA by 80%. It is not surprising that many countries have a growing interest in establishing programs that concentrate on mental wellness at the school level. These programs help combat mental health and behavioral problems. This presentation will concentrate on how the school counselor can facilitate reducing stigma and building mental health knowledge through a mental health curriculum.  The school counselors follow Kutcher and Wei’s (2017) high school mental health curriculum guide for all classroom guidance. After participating in the curriculum, students will become more aware of mental health, mental health concerns, and strategies to combat mental distress (Kutcher & Wei, 2017). Audience members will complete the same Pre test as students in the curriculum so that they can become aware of their own knowledge-base and mental health attitudes. Also, audience members will practice mindfulness, stress management techniques, and practice resiliency thinking. At the end, audience members will receive a packet of different relaxation tips and strategies to share with their students. 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
New Research
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Lauren Hodges, Savannah Arts Academy
Dr. Dawn Howell Hadley, Ed.D., Savannah Arts Academy
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 11:15–12:30, Magnolia A
Presenter Name(s)
Lacey Ricks
Malti Tuttle
Christy Land
Julia Chibbaro
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

The process of child abuse reporting can be scary, confusing, and intimidating for novice school counselors; especially since reporting procedure vary by school district and the amount of training provided can be limited. This research study looks at novice school counselors’ experiences with child abuse reporting in the southeastern United States and provides recommendations for existing school counselors and policy changes.

Description

This presentation will review trends and literature on child abuse reporting within the United States. Next, results from a study exploring novice school counselors’’ experiences with child abuse reporting will be reviewed. Quantitative results from the study show difference in child reporting trends based on the school counselors’ self-efficacy level, academic setting, and district income level. Additionally, qualitative analysis will provide insight from novice school counselors on common challenges they encountered when addressing child abuse reporting. Policy change recommendations and recommendations for school counselors will be provided based on the finding of this research study. The objectives of the program include, 1) to educate attendees on national trends in child abuse reporting, 2) to provide a review of our research studies findings; highlighting novices school counselors commonly faced challenges, and 3) to advocate for changes in child abuse reporting and training for school counselors. Audiences will be able to engage in the presentation through interactive discussion amongst the presenters and the attendees. Attendees will engage in small group and large group discussion within the presentation. Handouts will be provided to the attendees providing an overview of the research studies finding and a review of child abuse trends within the United States.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
New Research
Rural Counselors
Presenters
Dr. Lacey Ricks, Liberty University
Malti Tuttle, PhD, Auburn University
Christy Land, PhD, University of West Georgia
Dr. Julie Chibbaro, University of West Georgia
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 11:15–12:30, Magnolia CD
Presenter Name(s)
Lee E. Grimes and Sasha Quarles
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

School counselors are charged ethically with monitoring their level of stress to remain competent in the face of burnout. School counselors also are leaders in their schools and can be key players in building their teaching colleagues’ awareness of stress and potential burnout. Attendees to this session will learn about teacher burnout and ways that school counselors can support teachers towards healthy balance. All attendees will receive the presentation used for presentation at their schools

Description

Description of the content:  This session is designed to inform attendees about stress and burnout in teachers and suggest ways in which teachers can apply self-care strategies outlined by their school counselors. The presentation also suggests ways that school counselors can lead interventions in their schools to fight the effects of stress and burnout among teachers. Using Prezi, presenters will define and explain pertinent information about the effects of stress and burnout particularly as it applies to educational settings. Participants will be asked to identify and share with the group stressors they encounter among their teaching colleagues. Presenters will detail a variety of interventions targeting the stressors inherent in education. Attendees will be given the entire presentation to use at their school for a workshop or faculty meeting on the topic of planting the seeds of healthy balance and pulling the weeds of stress in the lives of teachers.

 

Learning objectives/outcomes:

  1. Participants will be able to define stress and burnout.
  2. Participants will be able to identify signs of burnout.
  3. Participants will be able to recognize the variety of stressors unique to educational settings.
  4. Participants will be able to offer strategies and techniques to teachers to assist with maintaining healthy balance to avoid burnout.
  5. Participants will be able to conduct a workshop or faculty meeting at their home school using the presentation from this session.

 

Opportunities for audience participation:

  1. Participants will be asked to share personal knowledge of stress, burnout, and self-care.
  2. Participants will be asked to discuss in pairs their beliefs about school counselor leadership on school climate and teacher stress.
  3. Participants will discuss in small groups the stressors they identify among their teachers
  4. Participants will be asked to brainstorm as a group ways to manage stress and avoid burnout.
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
CCRPI
Presenters
Dr. Lee Grimes, Valdosta State University
Sasha Quarles, Ed.S., Taylors Creek Elementary School
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 11:15–12:30, Ballroom B
Presenter Name(s)
Angela Cleveland, M.S.Ed., M.Ed, MA
Catherine Roberts, EdD, NCC, LPC
Christy Conley
Sean Myers
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Post-secondary/Admissions
Abstract

Georgia has nearly 21,182 open computing jobs (4.2x the state average demand rate); more than 70% of STEM careers require computer science. The arts, media and creative services–and even many middle-skills jobs–now run on computer science! The Information Age is driving rapid changes that make computer science literacy essential for every student. You are uniquely positioned to build awareness of pathways where computer science is the key to unlocking a world of opportunities.

Description

Georgia has nearly 21,182 open computing jobs (4.2x the state average demand rate) and more than 70% of STEM careers require computer science. The arts, media and creative services–and even many middle-skills jobs–now run on computer science! The Information Age is driving rapid changes that make computer science literacy essential for every student. You are uniquely positioned to build awareness of pathways where computer science is the key to unlocking a world of opportunities.  
Gain confidence in your ability to support viable pathways that complement Georgia's goals of building our diverse Computer Science-ready workforce.

Program Provider NCWIT Counselors for Computing (C4C) provides professional school counselors with information and resources they can use to support ALL students as they explore computer science education and careers.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Career Development
Presenters
Sean Myers, NA
Angela Cleveland, National Center for Women& Information Technology
Dr Catherine Roberts, Lovejoy High School
Christy P Conley, Ed.D, North Oconee High School
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 11:15–12:30, Grand Salon
Presenter Name(s)
Moya A. Pope, M.Ed, NCC
Monica Y. Pace, Ed.S
Shanna Williams
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

The International Institute for Restorative Practices has defined Restorative Practice as "an emerging social science that studies how to strengthen relationships between individuals as well as social connections within communities".  As counselors, we already know the importance of fostering positive, healthy school climates and helping students learn from their mistakes.  This session will give counselors tools to assist their teachers and parents learn more about Restorative Practice and use it in their classrooms and homes. 

Description

Learning objectives/outcomes - Participants will learn more about Restorative Practice - background of RP, different types of Restorative Practice, differences between RP and traditional discipline programs and a circle demonstration with audience members. 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Rural Counselors
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 11:15–12:30, Ballroom A
Presenter Name(s)
Alexandra Huguelet, Cobb County Public Schools
Leigh Gobbel, Pathways Transition Programs
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Abstract

Our students have increasing mental health needs and as school counselors, we cannot do it all on our own.  The need for collaboration is immense.  Come learn how one school counselor joined forces with an outside mental health provider to meet student mental health needs during the school day.  The school counselor and outside therapist will present how they built a one-on-one counseling program to increase students served from 2 to 125 – a 6,150% increase – in just two years. 

Description
  • Participants will learn one school’s process for initiating an outside counseling program within the school building
  • Participants will learn how to best utilize outside mental health providers in their building
  • Participants will understand the need for outside mental health provider collaboration to meet student mental health needs
  • Participants will have an opportunity to ask questions from a school counselor and outside mental health provider about the process
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Presenters
Alexandra Huguelet, Cobb County Public Schools
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 11:15–12:30, Room 312
Presenter Name(s)
Dr. Annette H. Patmon
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

Professional School Counselors work collaboratively with many stakeholders to provide a Multitiered System of Supports (MTSS) for at-risk students. Response to Intervention (RTI) is a tiered system of support that identifies and assists students at-risk for school failure. This session will explore the role of the professional school counselor as an active participant of the RTI process.

Description

This presentation will provide professional school counselors an overview of the the Response to Intervention (RTI) process and how it is used to identify and assist student at-risk for school failure. The components of the RTI process and comprehension school counseling program will be compared to show simularities within the programs.

The learning objectives/outcomes of this session will be that at the end of this session participants will be able to identfy each of the three tiers of RTI process, identify simularities of the RTI process and  the comprehensive counseling program, as well as the school counseling role associated with each tier of the RTI process.

Audience participation will be encouraged through out the session by using small prizes as rewards for correct responses. Also a 10 minute segement will be alloted at the end of the session for question and answers.

Handouts will not be provided for this presentation. The powerpoint presention will available to particpants and will be emailed upon particpants request. A sheet will be provide to collect email addresses.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Issues in Counseling
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 11:15–12:30, Room 306
Presenter Name(s)
Elizabeth R Butler, School Counselor
Melissa Lester Olson, LCSW
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

EFT Tapping is a simple, self-administered method of emotional regulation. Tapping is taught at all levels, from simple playful versions for young children, to more sophisticated versions for adults. Research supports Tapping's effectiveness for anxiety, phobia, trauma, physical discomfort and more. Use Tapping to help your students self-soothe, to help yourself with self-care, and to share with anyone who needs help calming, containing or regulating their emotions. You will leave this session with the skills to use Tapping right away!

Description

The Science of EFT Tapping (10 Minutes)

  • A Brief Review of 5 Compelling Randomized Controlled Studies
  • Reference for all EFT Tapping Research - AAMETInternational.org

Common Mechanisms and Dynamics of Tapping (10 minutes)

  • The Student / Client Experience of Tapping
  • Demonstration of EFT Tapping (Melissa Lester Olson)

Words of Caution (10 minutes)

  • To Do versus Not to Do
  • When to Use Tapping versus When to Not Use Tapping
  • Tapping versus Touch & Breathe

Common School Counselor - Student Scenarios Role-Played

  • Test Anxiety: Role-played with entire group/audience (10 minutes)
  • Emotional Dysregulation: Role-played with Melissa Lester Olson & Elizabeth Butler (10 minutes)
  • Somatic Symptoms: Role-played with volunteer from group (10 minutes)
  • Trauma: Role-played with Melissa Lester Olson & Elizabeth Butler (10 minutes)

Question & Answer (10 minutes)

Distribution to Attendees:

  • Visual aids for Tapping points (postcard, door hanger)
  • PDG visual aid for students
  • List of resources (research, videos, training opportunties)
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
New Research
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Elizabeth Butler, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.S., Alton C. Crews Middle School, Gwinnett County Public Schools
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Ballroom C
Presenter Name(s)
Kristin Moffett (Elementary School Counselor)
Megan Nellen, (Former Elementary School Principal/Educational Consultant)
Target Audience
Elementary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

Participants will hear how an elementary school leadership team in an independent school in Cobb County worked alongside a family with a transgender child and developed a structure to serve transgender children in the school community. Kristin Moffett and Megan Nellen will address the language created, strategies used, and educational opportunities provided to assist the student (and members of the student/parent/teacher/community) as our preschool student transitioned from a boy to living life as a girl. 

Description
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Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
New Research
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Mrs. Megan Nellen, Masters in Ed. Leadership, Confluence Educational Consulting, LLC
Kristin Moffett, Ed.S., The Walker School
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Room 306
Presenter Name(s)
Michael Keim & Julie Chibbaro
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

Today adolescent male students face additional challenges on the road to adulthood than previous generations, such as internet technology use/abuse.Based on current research and practical experience in both public and all-male private school settings, this presentation will identify major developmental challenges, present effective counseling approaches, and discuss strategies in small groups to promote healthy growth of male students.

Description

This presentation will evaluate current research on adolescent male development, identify challenges to healthy growth and development, such as drug and alcohol use/abuse, internet addictions (i.e., social media, gaming, pornography/sexting, parental separation/incarceration), while addressing strength-based and resiliency approaches to promote healthy pathways to adulthood. The impact of positive peer relationships, adult role modeling and mentoring, and emphasis on high expections of academic success will be discussed. Finally, opportunities for participants to share their experiences in working with this population through small groups will promote understanding and assist in integrating material presented into school counseling programs.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants will be able to:
    • Articulate current challenges to adolescent male development;
    • Discuss counseling strategies used in schols to address challenges to the development of adolescent males; and
    • Integrate strategies into school counseling programs

Learning Objectives:

  • The participant will:
    • Describe current developmental challenges facing adolescent males;
    • Identify strategies for addressing identified challenges; and
    • Formulate polans for integrating counseling strategies presented into school counseling programs.
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academics
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Career Development
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Information Technology
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Room 324
Presenter Name(s)
Jenni Briggs
Michelle Stevens
Target Audience
Elementary
Abstract

Are you tired of the same old, same old lessons? “Uh oh! I have group today!” Does this sound familiar? Do you want to bring some excitement to your school counseling program? Then, we have some ideas to share with you! We will present a handful of engaging core curriculum lessons, some creative as well as productive small group ideas, and a few other fresh components to take your program from “ho-hum” to “SO-FUN!”

Description

Participants will receive some fresh and creative core curriculum lessons and small group lessons related to the academic and personal/social domains. They will learn a variety of engaging and fun ways to present information to students. Participants will be asked to take part in some of the lesson activities for demonstration and participation purposes. Counselors will leave with core curriculum lesson plans that were shared in this session. Some of the topics that will be covered may include, but are not limited to the following: accepting differences, growth mindset, impulse control, generosity, social skills, and class meetings. Additionally, participants will leave with an assortment of fun and engaging activities which can be used in a variety of small counseling groups. The activities will include icebreakers, introductions, group lesson activities and group celebration ideas.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
ASCA Model
Academics
Personal/Social
Presenters
Jenni Briggs, Cobb County School District, Kemp Elementary
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Magnolia B
Presenter Name(s)
Lakisha Bonner, Coordinator, Counseling and Career Development Fayette County
Maria Sherrod, Fayetteville Elementary School Counselor Fayette County
Amanda McCann, Strivven Media, LLC
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Abstract

In elementary school students begin to adopt beliefs about themselves that can define their education and experiences. During those years, there is a huge opportunity to help children and parents become more aware of what can be accomplished at an early age to help a child become prepared for the real world because they are the leaders for tomorrow. Therefore, it is critically important to help our leaders recognize their potential as early as possible.

Description

Elementary school counselors create early awareness, knowledge and skills that lay the foundation for the academic rigor and social development necessary for college and career readiness.  Learn ways to inspire your students by broadening their awareness of future career opportunities. Engage them in the process of exploring careers using interactive, multimedia lessons.  

 

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Issues in Counseling
Career Development
CCRPI
College Readiness
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Magnolia A
Presenter Name(s)
Crystal Holt, Brittany DePlato

Presenters Information
Presenter 1: Name * Brittany De Plato
Presenter 1: Email Address * b.deplato@grady.k12.ga.us
Presenter 1: Work Phone * 229-307-1722
Presenter 1: Cell Phone * 229-977-1099
Presenter 1: Educational Background/Professional Training: Ed.S. in School Counseling, Valdosta State University
Presenter 1: Certification/Licensures * LPC, NCC
Presenter 1: Employment Background * Whigham School, Grady County BOE
Presenter 1: Professional Organizations * GSCA, ASCA, LPCA

Presenter 2: Name: Crystal Holt
Presenter 2: Email Address c.holt@grady.k12.ga.us
Presenter 2: Work Phone 229-307-1747
Presenter 2: Cell Phone 229-216-1974
Presenter 2: Educational Background/Professional Training: M.Ed. in Counselor Education, Georgia Southern
Presenter 2: Certification/Licensures NCC
Presenter 2: Employment Background Cairo High School, Grady County BOE
Presenter 2: Professional Organizations GSCA, FSCA, ASCA
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Rural school counselors face many challenges due to their varying roles, responsibilities, and geographical locations. However, school counselors also have the unique opportunity to be change agents in their schools and communities. One factor that must be addressed in order to see the desired success and advocacy is combating the potential for burnout in rural school counselors. Come hear some strategies, suggestions, struggles, and successes!

Description

The uniqueness of school counseling in rural Georgia will be explored through identification and discussion of the challenges faced by rural school counselors, along with the benefits to serving rural communities. Participants will identify the three main struggles and perks for his/her individual setting. Strategies to address the challenges through advocacy and collaboration will be shared before focusing in on the biggest potential challenge to rural school counselors: burnout. In the book, Burnout: The High Cost of High Achievement, author Dr. Herbert Freudenberger, presents the idea of the “over-achiever” syndrome, suggesting that individuals (school counselors) who are the most invested, dedicated, valuable, and successful run the greatest risk for burning out. After establishing what burnout is, and how it differs from compassion fatigue or vicarious trauma, participants will identify character strengths and how to use those strengths as modes for self-care, which is a necessity for rural school counselors. Participants will develop a self-care plan, and have a chance to win one of our “self-care kits.”

 

The audience will participate in think-pair-share style discussions about the challenges, benefits, character strengths, and self-care plans.

 

Handouts will include: the PowerPoint Presentation, a copy of the VIA Classification of Character Strengths and Virtues found at www.viacharacter.org, and a working document for developing the self-care plan.

 

Learning objectives:

Participants will identify and discuss three challenges related to working as rural school counselors.

Participants will identify and discuss three benefits to serving in rural communities.

Participants will identify and discuss five character strengths.

Participants will create means of self-care from the five character strengths.

Participants will develop a self-care plan.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Issues in Counseling
Rural Counselors
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Room 303
Presenter Name(s)
Ms. Ashley Chennault
Ms. Lisa Miller
Ms. Grace Pniewski
Mrs. Chastity Williams
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

Do your students struggle to mediate conflict before it escalates? Do you need more tools in your toolbox to mediate conflicts with collegues and parents? If so, join us in learning about specific methods to proactively minimize conflict before it becomes problematic and reactively manage existing conflict in a positive and effective way. 

Description

Our session will target the following ASCA Mindsets and Behaviors: 

M1. Belief in development of whole self, including a healthy balance of mental, social/emotional and physical well being 

M3. Sense of belonging in the school environment 

B-LS 9. Gather evidence and consider multiple perspectives to make informed decisions

B-SMS 7. Demonstrate effective coping skills when faced with a problem 

B-SS 1. Use effective oral and written communication skills and listening skills 

B-SS 2. Create positive and supportive relationships with other students

B-SS 3. Create relationships with adults that support success 

B-SS 4. Demonstrate empathy 

B-SS 7. Use leadership and teamwork skills to work effectivley in diverse teams

B-SS 8. Demonstrate advocacy skills and ability to assert self, when necessary 

Objectives/Outcomes: To provide attendees with 5 detailed methods to tackle conflict resolution in a kindergarten through eighth grade setting.  

We will have role plays and opportunities for the audience to participate in discussions, ask questions, and collaborate with collegues. Dialogue and  technology participation will be encouraged. 

Our presentation, along with handouts will be provided as a link on the GSCA app and website. 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
ASCA Model
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Ms. Lisa Miller, Centennial Academy
Ms. Ashley Chennault, Centennial Academy
Mrs. Chastity Williams, Centennial Academy
Ms. Grace Pniewski, Centennial Academy
Session Materials
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Ballroom B
Presenter Name(s)
Scarlet C. Brown
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Many students are exposed to traumatic events that often affect learning and/or behavior. More information and specialized strategies are needed to meet the needs of students in today’s schools. This session will provide an overview of the impact of trauma on development, specifically on the brain and learning. In addition, counselors will be equipped with help and hope for fostering bounce and learn strategies to equip students with the skills to succeed.

Description
The session will review research from ACEs study, CDC, GSU Child Welfare Training on Trauma, NCTSN, Trauma & Learning Policy Institute, and additional sources. Tips and handouts on resilience building, de-escalation, calm down spaces, and more will be shared during the presentation. In addition, during the presentation a variety of recommended trauma resources, toolkits, books, websites, videos, and more will be shared to extend participants' trauma-informed knowledge, skills, and practice beyond the session. 
 
Learning Objectives:
  • Develop an understanding of Adverse Childhood Experiences and why educators need to know about ACEs
  • Define and understand effects of trauma
  • Become aware of the impact of trauma on the Brain & Development
  • Explore strategies for getting kids into the Learning Mode
  • Understand how counselors can foster Bounce and Wobble in students
  • Review strategies for Self-Care

Door prizes consisting of trauma resources (up to 10) will be provided during the training.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
New Research
Social Emotional Learning
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Grand Salon
Presenter Name(s)
Name: Jennifer Bywaters
Presenter: jbywaters@gaca.connectionsacademy.org
Presenter: 678-674-5808
Presenter:770-584-2634
B.A. in Mathematics, M.Ed in Educational Administration. Leadership certificate. Former high school math teacher, current graduation coach. RAMP award winning school 2018

Name: Sara Tran
Email Address: stran@gaca.connectionsacademy.org
Work Phone: 678.744.6741
Cell Phone: 678.525.7903
Educational Background/Professional Training: M.Ed Professional School Counseling
Certification/Licensures* SRS School Counseling P-12
Employment Background: Head High School Counselor, Georgia Connections Academy, 6 years
Professional Organizations: GSCA and ASCA member
Honors/Awards; School Counselor of the Year at Georgia Connections Academy: 2016-2017, RAMP Award Winning School 2018
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Abstract

Struggling students are often difficult to reach. They often appear lazy, defiant, and defensive when they are actually frustrated, overwhelmed, and feeling helpless, unintelligent, and alone. They build walls to hide the real issues. We will discuss how to include teachers, administrators and parents to break through these walls and help them overcome their struggles.  You will leave with handouts with strategies to implement in your school.

Description

Struggling students are often difficult to reach. On the surface they often appear lazy, indifferent, defiant, and defensive when they are underneath they are actually frustrated, overwhelmed, and feeling helpless, unintelligent, and alone. They build walls to hide these issues. We will discuss how to break through these walls to discover the real issues and how to help them overcome.

Often teachers who who work daily these student will sometimes be very hesitant to work with you to help these students.  Certain teachers can be unyielding and unsympathetic. These students inadvertently become identified/stereotyped by their behaviors and often miss out on the real help they need as a consequence.  This session will address getting teacher and administration buy-in to work with you to help the student, which can often be half of the challenge.

This session will address how to make real connections with these students to prevent them from falling through the cracks.  Through Student Success Session which involve administrators, the graduation coach, counselors, parents and students, we collaborate to develop a plan to ensure each individual student’s academic success. These sessions allow families to experience group instruction, individual instruction, and individual meetings with counselors.  Students complete a Student Success Contract before leaving that helps identify barriers and how they plan to overcome them.

Participants will leave the session with handouts of strategies, resources, and ideas to use in each of their unique school environments.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Academics
Personal/Social
Academic Achievement
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Room 308
Presenter Name(s)
Barbara Truluck, M.Ed., NCC
Palmer Middle School, Kennesaw, GA
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

The impact of the stress and anxiety epidemic among students is felt in all areas of the school experience. It interferes with learning for students who struggle with staying in class while feeling highly stressed. This small group responsive intervention helps students who were experiencing high stress levels and school anxiety. The purpose is to work with students who need extra support to acquire skills necessary to reduce anxiety and help build resiliency. 

 

Description

The impact of the stress and anxiety epidemic among students is felt in all areas of the school experience. It clearly interferes with learning, not only for the students who struggle with staying in class while feeling highly stressed, but for teachers and schools who need to cope with the resulting class disruptions and absenteeism. This small group intervention is formed to help students who were experiencing high stress levels and school anxiety due to social/emotional issues, academic performance, and the demands and stressors of adolescence. The purpose of this responsive small group intervention is to work with students who for a variety of reasons need extra support to acquire skills necessary to reduce school related anxiety and help build resiliency. Small group techniques include play and art therapy, music therapy, stress relieving techniques, relaxation breathing, journaling, and goal setting. Outcome data measures trends in students missing class time and chronic absences from school because of stress related symptoms.  

Learning objectives/outcomes:

Professional School Counselors will learn and practice “Stress Busters” techniques to use with their students in small groups settings. The goal is for students to acquire knowledge in ways to counteract toxic stress, build resiliency, learn techniques to de-escalate anxiety, how to prioritize, mindfulness, and build social connections within the support group.

Audience Participation: 

  1. Brain storm “Good Stress vs. Bad Stress” with elbow partner
  2. Journal stress triggers in our own lives and share
  3. Presenter will guide participants through Mindfulness & Visualization technique activity
  4. Stretching & breathing exercise to relaxation music
  5. Short video on school stress by students
  6. CBT art activity: Vision Boards

ASCA Domain(s), Standard(s), & Competency:  

M1: Belief in development of whole self, including a healthy balance of mental, social/emotional and physical well-being.

M2: Self-confidence in ability to succeed.

M3: Sense of belonging in the school.

M5: Belief in using abilities to their fullest to achieve high-quality results.

B-SMS6: Demonstrate ability to overcome barriers to learning.

B-SMS7: Demonstrate effective coping skills when faces with a problem.

B-SS2: Create positive and supportive relationships with other students.

B-SS3: Create relationships with adults that support success.  

B-SS8: Demonstrate advocacy skills and ability to assert self when necessary.

 

 

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academics
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Room 309
Presenter Name(s)
Fabion Vicks
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

The job of a professional school counselor has evolved over the last 10 years to where we are a proactive position. Our position is looked at as a person who stands in the gap for students with needs assessment data & integration within the three domains. Professional school counselors should have the tools to integrate various forms into their comprehensive program to help meet the needs of students more effectively.

Description

Outcomes: To show counselors how to integrate data and technology into their program to become a comprehensive program.

 

Objective: To show counselors how to integrate different forms of technology into their comprehensive counseling program. This presentation will give counselors an opportunity to see that plethora of tools that are at their disposal to improve their program. 

                  

Audience participation: Pre/posttest on various tools that can be used in counseling programs and if they have presently integrated them.

  1. Pre-test QR code with questions on familiarity on Microsoft/google forms, how to use scheduling in google, or other tools like schedule once, digital newsletter using SWAY or powerpoint.
  2. Posttest will have qr code and gauge what they have learned about digital tools they can utilize in their program.

 

Resources: Digital example (weebly page to show how they can integrate a counseling website to their program). Other resources would be instructions on how to maximize Microsoft tools into their counseling program.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
ASCA Model
Academics
Personal/Social
College Readiness
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Information Technology
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Ballroom A
Presenter Name(s)
Boone L. Benton, Ph.D.
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Abstract

Conflict is a natural part of life for all people. Conflict resolution skills learned through peer mediation is a powerful and effective way to promote and increase emotional intelligence among middle school and high school students – a social/emotional period of time when these skills are needed the most! This presentation will give YOU the tools to develop a peer mediation program, train your student mediators, implement the intervention, and track program effectiveness.

Description

Implementation of Peer Mediator Programs: An Intervention to Promote Emotional Intelligence.

Learning outcome: Participants will be able to implement, train, and sustain a peer mediation program at their school. Documentation forms and mediation steps will be handed out.

  1. Brief history of peer mediation – review types of training models (Group, cadre, student body)
  2. Cadre model of training selected and rationales provided
  3. What is Emotional Intelligence (EI)?  Ways counselors encourage growth in EI among their students. "The awareness of one's emotions, ability to detect emotions in others, and adjust responses for a mutually beneficial outcome.'
  4. Social/Emotional Learning opportunities through peer mediation
  5. Understanding and identifying your individual conflict styles
  6. Conducting a needs assessment to support peer mediation
  7. Selection of student mediators – peer mediators
  8. Implementation of peer mediation training
  9. Review of peer mediation steps
  10. Some common mistakes in peer mediation
  11. Benefit to school counselors
  12. Proper documentation of counseling intervention
  13. Promotion and marketing of your mediation program
  14. Data collection to determine program effectiveness
  15. Role Play - Four participants will volunteer to conduct a role-play for a peer mediation
  16. Wrap up and closing questions.
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Social Emotional Learning
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Room 312
Presenter Name(s)
Cameron Aurandt
Target Audience
Independent
Post-secondary/Admissions
Abstract

You are reaching the end of your master’s program with high hopes for what the future has to offer. You are ready to be a school counselor but what do you do next? What will it be like during your first year as a school counselor on your own? This session will provide graduate students with the opportunity to ask a panel of school counselors about the application process, hiring process, and what to expect in their first couple of years as a school counselor. Graduate students will also be given the chance to talk with other students about their experiences as they begin their journey as a school counselor.

Description

This session will provide graduate students with an opportunity to ask experienced school counselors about what their day to day is like, the interviewing process that they are about to begin, and any other questions that they might want to ask. Planting the seeds for success also applies to our graduate students. We must promote the success of future school counselors by providing them with the information they need to as they enter the field.  Following the session, I will create a handout of the questions and answers that will be emailed to each attendee.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Graduate Students
Presenters
Cameron C Aurandt, Valdosta State University and Georgia School Counselor Association (GSCA)
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Room 310
Presenter Name(s)
Dr. Karen D. Rowland
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Social networking is constantly evolving. With real-time photo and video sharing becoming the big trend that school age students are constantly using. Students are using the virtual world to communicate with one another through Snapchat, Instagram, WhatsApp, Tumblr, Musical.ly, to name a few. This workshop will explore the popular sites that today’s students are flocking to, the reasons for doing so, and how school counselors can be prepared to effectively work with students who use or misuse social media.

Description

In a world of Snapchat, Instagram, WhatsApp, Tumblr and Musical.ly, to name a few; schools are challenged today more than ever before on the effects of students’ constant use of social media! With society practically gone mobile, real-time photo and video sharing is now the big trend that school age children are most excited about. While the use of social media can have many advantages, there are equally many disadvantages some of which have proven to be detrimental, and in some cases life-threatening for students. Bullying, sexual harassment, child pornography, sex trafficking, suicide threats and ideation, health risk challenges, kidnapping, and even murder are some of the many dangers of social media use in students.

It is vitally important for school counselors to be aware and knowledgeable of the social media platforms, how they are being used, and also the effects on those using them and those being used on.

This workshop seeks to accomplish the following learning outcomes for school counselors especially at the middle and high schools.

  1. The 10 most popular social media platforms being used by students.
  2. Benefits and dangers of social media applications for students.
  3. Specific ways that students, particularly teens, use other apps to hide risky apps, usually not sanctioned by their parents or guardians.
  4. Effective school counseling techniques for helping students understand the dangers or misuse of social media.
  5. Helpful tips for school counselors to provide to parents on guiding their children in using social media safely.

 

The workshop will also provide some level of interaction and discussion with the presenter and the audience. Each school counselor will leave with a handout of the presentation as well as any other materials relevant to the topic.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Social Emotional Learning
Information Technology
Session Materials
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Ballroom DE
Presenter Name(s)
Brandi Sabb
Target Audience
Secondary
Abstract

School counselors play a vital role in both helping students make the connection between academic success and postsecondary planning as well as ensuring school success towards the College and Career Ready Performance Index (CCRPI). In this session, participants will explore best practices and resources to maximize college and career readiness through the latest innovations and changes to the SAT Suite of Assessments (SAT, PSAT/NMSQT, PSAT 10 and PSAT 8/9).

Description

Through statewide PSAT/NMSQT administrations for sophomores as well as SAT School Day or PSAT 8/9 opportunities in some districts, Georgia middle and high school students have FREE access to resources and tools such as Khan Academy, AP Potential, Big Future, and Roadmap to Careers.

Participants will explore ways to maximize FREE College Board resources, programs and initiatives to ensure college and career readiness for students.

This will be an interactive session designed to propel best practices and habits of mind support. An electronic toolkit will be provided.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Career Development
CCRPI
College Readiness
Academic Achievement
Presenters
Cale Golden, College Board
Brandi Sabb, The College Board
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 13:30–14:45, Magnolia CD
Presenter Name(s)
Markita Grant
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

Attend this session to learn about the resources available within the Georgia Career Information System (GCIS) and GCIS administration tools. GCIS is a college and career-readiness online program. GCIS provides current, comprehensive information and is proud to be a statewide resource managed by the Georgia Career Information Center at Georgia State University. GCIS is available to EVERY public middle and high school in the state of Georgia at no cost.

Description

During this session, participants will:
 
• Increase their knowledge of use to locate relevant career clusters, occupations, pathways, programs of study, US and Georgia schools; and financial aid opportunities
• Simulate the steps used to access activities, curriculum, and lesson plans
• Understand state reporting and how GCIS provides real time tracking for your students success
• Gain clarity on how you and your students log on to SLDS to access GCIS to get started
• Leave with resources to help you jump start your action plan

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Academics
Rural Counselors
CCRPI
Information Technology
Presenters
Ms Markita J Grant, Georgia State University
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 15:30–16:45, Ballroom A
Presenter Name(s)
Maria Grovner, Sonya Wright, Rebecca Ginsberg, Rachel Kaney, Anita Ragland
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

School counselors have a vital role regarding college and career readiness. Come on a college and career journey with the school counselors in Atlanta Public Schools to learn about their approach in implementing a comprehensive K-12 college and career plan, with a seamless transition from level to level. Counselors from all levels will present information and resources on how their efforts have helped meet the district’s mission of every student graduating college and career ready.

Description

Tentative Outline:

  • Technology and College/Career Readiness
  • Literacy and College/Career Readiness
  • Small Groups College/Career Readiness
  • Activities and  College/Career Readiness
  • College and Career Readiness Activities

 

 

Learning Objectives

  • Educate stakeholders about our role in college and career readines
  • Explain how one district used this as a way to create a districtwide mandated activites
  • Replicate presented lesson plans and activities                                                                     
  • K-12 program guide which includes handouts with lessons and activities that can be replicated no matter the grade level (electronic link)
  • Audience Participation: use of mobile device, think-pair-share activity, action plan for what they will implement
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Career Development
College Readiness
Presenters
Maria Grovner, EdS, Atlanta Public Schools
Sonya Wright, EdS, LPC, NCSC, NCC, Atlanta Public Schools
Rebecca Heacox, M.Ed, Atlanta Public Schools
Anita Ragland, EdS, Atlanta Public Schools
Rachel Kaney, EdS, Drew Charter School/Atlanta
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 15:30–16:45, Magnolia B
Presenter Name(s)
Jennifer Collins
Target Audience
Elementary
Abstract

Academic Student Led Teams are a great way for students to show leadership and ownership of their learning.  School Counselors are an essential part of students' success. Learn how an elementary school and school counselor took Parent/Teacher Conferences to the next level through social emotional strategies, lessons, and goals. Attendees will learn about the ASLT process and the counselor's role.  They will also receive lesson ideas and examples to take with them.

Description

Academic Student Led Teams are a great way for students to show leadership and ownership of their learning.  Most schools traditionally do Parent/Teacher Conferences.  After evaluating parent involvement and student ownership we decided to go a step further which eventually resulted in ASLT or Academic Student Led Teams.  Learn how an elementary school and school counselor took Parent/Teacher Conferences to the next level through social emotional strategies, lessons, and goals.  In the ASLT process school counselors are essential in helping teach all students how to set goals, both social emotional and academic.

Learning Objectives and Outcomes:

  • Attendees will understand the ASLT process and how to hold ASLTs
  • Attendees will leave our session with the ability to implement ASLTs
  • Attendees will know the role of the school counselor in ASLT
  • Attendees will know how to help students set social emotional and academic goals and be able to set them with students

Attendees will participate in an opportuniy to set their own social emotional goals.  All participants will receive handouts containing information given in the presentation and lessons to implement immediately.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 15:30–16:45, Room 309
Presenter Name(s)
Sarah Wenham
Target Audience
Secondary
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Post-secondary/Admissions
Abstract

Researching postsecondary opportunities can be an overwhelming task for some high school students. School counselors play a crucial role in helping students understand and navigate their options. Join this session to learn more about the University System of Georgia (USG) and the resources available to help students make informed choices. This session will also highlight some of the exciting and innovative USG initiatives that support student success and completion as they begin their postsecondary experience.

Description

During the session:

  • Participants will be introduced to the University System of Georgia and the location of the USG institutions across the state.
  • Participants will learn about the four types/sectors of postsecondary institutions that comprise the University System of Georgia.
  • Participants will learn how the USG freshman admission requirements vary by institutional sector and will learn where to find all USG admission requirements on the USG website.
  • Participants will learn about the USG’s Required High School Curriculum (RHSC) and will be introduced to the USG's Staying on Course resource.
  • Participants will learn where to find various admissions resources and related information on the USG website.
  • Participants will learn about the USG dual enrollment admission requirements and will learn where to find the information for all USG institutions on the USG website.
  • Participants will be introduced to a number of current USG initiatives designed to help students enroll, progress, and complete.

There will not be any handouts provided but participants will leave with an awareness of where to find a number of useful resources on the USG website.

There will be numerous opportunities for audience participation.  In addition to sharing information in the session, the session will also provide the opportunity for participants to share if there are any additional resources that the USG System Office can provide that would help school counselors as they help students explore postsecondary options.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
College Readiness
Academic Achievement
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 15:30–16:45, Room 308
Presenter Name(s)
Patty Montague
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Counselors are always looking for creative and free ways to support students and families in the college admissions process.  With testing being important both for admission and for financial aid and scholarships, finding free tools that can help students prepare and boost their scores are important.  This session will highlight the similarities and differences between the ACT and SAT, and provide resources that counselors can share with students.

Description

Counselors will come away with an understanding of the two main admissions tests - SAT and ACT and free resources for students to help with preparation for the tests.  Additional resources that counselors will receive are:

      - representative list of colleges that have scholarships that are tied to GPA / test scores

      - sites for financial aid, loan debt burden by college, net price calculator

      - listing of free or low-cost counselor PD opportunities for college admissions information

While the delivery will be mainly lecture, participants will get to see the sites and how to help students set up accounts or perform a search.  Additional value will come with information about helpful blogs, websites, and social media sites to stay current in a fast-paced constantly changing environment.

Counselors will leave the session with greater confidence about testing specifically and how to access college admissions information generally.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
College Readiness
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 15:30–16:45, Grand Salon
Presenter Name(s)
Dr. Natalie Looney, Kimberly Blackshear, Robin Blackwell, Pam Griswell, and Yunilda Nunez
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Abstract

Counselors have the ability to be change agents in their schools. They can help facilitate a caring culture where students, faculty, and families feel they are valued members of the school community. This session will explore how counselors can leverage their knowledge and expertise of ASCA Mindsets and emotional intelligence to help facilitate a positive culture. Participants will use a culture framework to examine and establish best practices for their school setting.

Description

The session will begin with a review of the culture framework. The framework will include aspects of culture related to interactions in a school setting (student to student, student to teacher, teacher to teacher, school to family, and student to family). Using the ASCA mindsets and Daniel Goleman’s work on Emotional Intelligence, participants will examine how to enrich each of these relationships through social interactions. The session will include individual and group reflection, group discussion, and interaction with tangible resources. Participants will leave with an action plan to take back to their school to help facilitate the conversation and lead initiatives that help to cultivate a caring culture.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
ASCA Model
Personal/Social
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 15:30–16:45, Room 310
Presenter Name(s)
Zane Shelfer EdS, LPC, NCC, NCSC
Assistant Superintendent
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

If you have ever wondered what happens when a student enters the Department of Juvenile Justice School System, this presentation is for you. Come learn how the Department of Juvenile Justice School System is working to build a better future for students while they are enrolled. An overview of the agency and school system will be provided. In addition, information about programs, graduation, reentry, and transition into and out of the system will be discussed.

Description

The content of my program will be a comprehensive overview of the DJJ school system with specific information that school counselors will find helpful when they work with justice involved youth. The learning objectives are 1) an understanding of the DJJ School System, 2) insight into working with justice involved youth, and 3) discussing how school counselors can be part of a support system for their DJJ youth. A PowerPoint will be provided.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Issues in Counseling
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 15:30–16:45, Ballroom B
Presenter Name(s)
Rhonda K. Harris, LMSW
Jessica M. Thompson, Ed.S
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Behavior is the way our students talk to us.  Within the school setting we have been taught to look at behavior as attention seeking, escaping or manipulation.  In this presentation, we will dig deeper and examine an innovative approach based on a new understanding of the brain.  We will share theories, practices and frameworks that best facilitate how to implement interventions within a three-tiered model. 

 

Description

A hands-on session demonstrating and discussing the most engaging, strategies for addressing emotional and social concerns of students for Tier 2 and Tier 3 interventions.  An overview of an effective student referral process, evidence based interventions like Positive Action and Second Step as well as tried and true tools such as Zones of Regulation, Social Thinking, Mindfulness and creative interventions.

The learning objectives are: 

  1. Summarize relationship of how the brain effects behavior.
  2. Summarize the framework of lagging skills to understand problematic behavior.
  3. Summarize how an effective referral process of PBIS fits within the MTSS model.
  4. Demonstrate interventions for addressing emotional and social concerns at Tier II and Tier III that address lagging skills.

 

We will examine the brains role in emotional regulation and how to connect and redirect when a student becomes dysregulated.  By using connection and redirection, we can build the neuro connections necessary by providing time and practice with students in order to develop the lagging skills they need for self-regulation. 

 

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Social Emotional Learning
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 15:30–16:45, Ballroom C
Presenter Name(s)
Amy Short
Lauren Butler
Target Audience
Secondary
Abstract

 

Graduation rates are always in the news but what programs happen behind the scenes to positively impact scores? Come learn how 1 high school raised their graduation rate to over 90% by effectively implementing programs for student success. Participants will walk away with resources for improving their schools graduation rate, including program specific details, resources for better leveraging school personnel support, how school counselors can directly impact student achievement, and tips for advocating with administration.  

 

Description
Administrators, parents, real estate agents, potential new families, publication rankings and more- everyone has an interest in, and opinion about, high school graduation rates. While only the final number is reported, many interventions take place in the local high school that help improve the graduation rate, and counselors can play a key role in these endeavors. Our goal for session attendees is to share successful interventions and programs that support student success and directly impact graduation rates. We want to empower attendees to have meaningful conversations at their local schools about the best use of counselor time and responsibilities as it relates to supporting student achievement and the metrics used to determine this distribution. We will look at the activities from two points of view: 1). school-wide options for credit recovery and how the counselor can support these school-wide initiatives and 2). counselor specific, data-driven, programming implemented through the school counseling office. Participants will be provided with a comprehensive listing of successful credit recovery and student promotion programs as well as learn about how the school counseling office, when aligned with ASCA’s mindsets and behaviors, can directly support student achievement. In realizing that the structure and duties within a counseling department varies from school to school and county to county, we will share our departments transformation from required testing coordination to fully a ASCA aligned and RAMP awarded program. Additionally, we will highlight programs within the counseling department that directly support raising the graduation rate.  Participants will walk away with tips for discussing their own transformation with administration and how using counselors effectively can have a positive impact on students, staff, and the ever important student graduation rate.

Learning Objectives/Outcomes

Participants will be able to identify opportunities in their building for
increasing graduation rate, including:

Physical location for credit recovery lab

Improved record keeping at student enrollment and withdrawal

Options for better leveraging time within the school day and within the school schedule

Participants will be able to better understand credit recovery options available from the state as well as understand what questions to ask regarding programs in their county.

Participants will learn how to discuss ASCA aligned counselor programming with administration to help support graduation rates.       

Participants will be able to review their current programming offerings and address which areas directly impact student achievement and the graduation rate.   

 

Opportunities for Audience Participation

Share best practices in alternative options for credit recovery

Collaboration among peers about biggest roadblocks to students
graduating within 4 years

Participants will be able to share current success stories related to raising their graduation rate and supporting student success

Handouts/Resources for distribution

Comprehensive listing of programs implemented at Roswell with direct impact on graduation rate

Georgia Credit Recovery Program Information Sheet and usage
plan at Roswell High School

Fulton County and Roswell High School Strategic Plans as related to goals towards improving graduation rate

Tips for better aligning support personnel responsibilities within the framework of increasing graduation rates

Programming handout used in advocacy with administration to better align with ASCA.
 


            

           

 

 
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Academics
CCRPI
Academic Achievement
Presenters
Mrs. Amy Short, Ed.S, Fulton County Schools
Mrs. Lauren Butler, Roswell High School
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 15:30–16:45, Room 324
Presenter Name(s)
Christina Cotsakis Cordón, Morgan Zwicker Jones
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Abstract

Have you ever wanted to include languages other than English in your counseling program, but were unsure how? This session will discuss how school counselors can identify languages present in the school community and intentionally incorporate these languages into the school counseling program in both dual-language immersion (DLI) and traditional classrooms, even if the counselor does not speak each language.

Description

The American School Counselor Association (ASCA) Ethical Standards for School Counselors state that school counselors should “strive to use… bilingual/multilingual school counseling program materials representing languages used by families in the school community” and “affirm the abilities of and advocate for the learning needs of all students” (2016, p. 7). This responsibility applies to all schools but is a unique challenge in dual language immersion (DLI) programs. School counselor training often does not include methods of utilizing bilingual or multilingual program components (Clemente & Collison, 2000; Smith-Adcock, Daniels, Lee, Villalba & Delicato, 2006). This session will discuss how school counselors can incorporate community languages into the school counseling program in both DLI and traditional classrooms.

As a result of this session, participants will:

  1. Understand how school counselors can incorporate multiple languages in dual-language immersion classrooms,
  2. Learn how to identify languages used in their school community and resources related to those languages, and 
  3. Consider methods of incorporating languages used in the school community into traditional classrooms and schools, even if the counselor does not speak each language represented.

During the presentation, the audience will participate in activities in languages other than English that the presenters have used in the classroom. Presenters will ask for audience input to guide the direction of the presentation and specific content covered. The audience will also be able to participate by contributing any knowledge that they may have related to incorporating languages in the school counseling program. Participants will be able to discuss their thoughts on using other languages in their schools and share ideas. We will provide handouts related to finding out which languages have a presence in your community and finding resources in languages other than English.

 American School Counselor Association (2016). Ethical standards for school counselors. Retrieved from https://www.schoolcounselor.org/asca/media/asca/Ethics/EthicalStandards2016.pdf

Clemente, R., & Collison, B. B. (2000). The Relationships Among Counselors, ESL Teachers, and Students. Professional School Counseling3(5), 339.

Smith-Adcock, S., Daniels, M. H., Lee, S. M., Villalba, J. A., & Indelicato, N. A. (2006). Culturally Responsive School Counseling for Hispanic/Latino Students and Families: The Need for Bilingual School Counselors. Professional School Counseling10(1), 92-101.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Issues in Counseling
New Research
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Morgan Zwicker Jones, Athens Academy
Christina Cotsakis Cordón, Oglethorpe Avenue Elementary School Counselor
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 15:30–16:45, Room 312
Presenter Name(s)
Hope Huey, McIntosh High School
LeeAnn Belknap, McIntosh High School
Target Audience
Secondary
Abstract

A complete five day lesson plan targeting the Bridge Bill requirement for 11th graders.  Our presentation will cover career researching, college researching, college application process, college admissions essay, academic resume and documentation used for the Bridge Bill requirement.  We will be using Naviance as our tool for research. We also use an internet program called "Blackboard" to provide students with needed documents or information and we also make use of the Google Drive and Forms.

Description
This project began as a career research tool with academically challenged 9th graders.  The purpose was to assist them with goal setting and looking beyond high school to career possibilities.  Several years ago, when the Bridge Bill began, the project was moved to 11th grade and used to assist our Juniors with their College and Career Research, and additionally used to meet the new Bridge Bill requirement.  Approximtely, 90% of our students will attend a 4 year or 2 year college upon graduation, so our focus leans more toward college but we also cover other options for students individually.
 
Day 1
We begin with a pre-test of the items we are hoping they will learn through the project.  This test is is a google form.  After the pre-test we give an overview of the entire project and our expected outcome.  Students will have a future career option, 3 post secondary plans which will help them achieve their career goal, information of admission requirements and the general process for applying to college, military options, an academic resume, senior brag sheet to use for recommendations, and a written college essay.
 
Using Naviance, students take a personlity inventory under the Career tab, which will provide them their personality type as well as career clusters for their personality type.  The full report of their results are saved to their Google Drive in a folder marked College and Career Project, which is shared with their counselor.  Students are also asked to save their 3 top career choices in their Naviance account.  For homework, students are asked to complete an additional inventory called "Career Cluster" which is also in their Naviance account.  They are asked to save an additional top 3 career choices.  
 
Day 2
We developed a power point presentation/google presentation about the importance of continued Education and the relationship to salary.  Additionally, we developed a lecture style portion of the class on types of colleges, private vs public, various degrees or certificates than can be obtained, and college entrance exams. 
 
In Naviance, students are going to complete "Super Match College Search."  This search allows students to choose various items of importance to them in a college (example: housing, location, school type, school size, athletics, etc.).  The counselor reviews the importance of college tours and items the student needs to consider. The search engine, will allow students to view a spreadsheet style document of all the colleges the students pin to their "Colleges I'm Thinking About." This list will be available for students their senior year for applications, recommendations and completing various college application processes.  We use an internet tool called "Blackboard" which allows us to post any documents or items that we need students to have access too.  Students go to our "Blackboard" page to retrieve a document called "My College List."  This document requires them to choose a minimum of 3 post-secondary options and to research the admissions process and requirements along with scholarship deadlines as well.   This document is to be completed by the next class meeting and saved to their College and Career Folder which is shared with their counselor in the google drive.  For those students who are seeking options outside of college, we work with them individually and allow them to use other resources and possible options for post-secondary planning.
 
For those students seeking military options, on Naviance they can go to the college tab and in the "college search tab"  type in United States and the branches of military will pull up and allow them to search military options.  
 
Day 3
Students are introduced to the college essay topics via our "Blackboard" page.  We use the Common Application essay prompts since more and more colleges are joining this college application program.  This essay is to be written and shared with their English teacher as well as saved in their College and Career folder on their google drive, who will grade it for content as well as grammar/mechanics.  
 
For the remainder of this class period, students are able to complete a document called "Senior Brag Sheet" which is found on our "Blackboard" page.  A copy of this document will be provided to the participants of the workshop.  This document is used in the senior year for letters of recommendation and organization of items to be included in their college applications. They also save this document in their College and Career folder on the google drive. This document is graded for completion and gives counselors an opportunity to provide feedback to students prior to beginning their senior year of high school.  A copy of the grading rubric will be provided to workshop participants. 
 
 
Day 4
We go over the different areas of a resume.  We provide them copies of examples, but encourage them to use their creativity as well as other internet resources.  We provide them with a copy of action words they can use as well.  We also provide them with a rubric for grading the resume, which shows them the components we are looking for in their resume.  A copy of the rubric will be provided to the participants in the workshop.  The counselors grade the resume for a grade.  The remainder of this day, is dedicated to working on resumes and allow counselors the opportunity to provide feedback and support individually to the students.
 
Day 5
This day is typically held toward the end of their Junior year.  We go over the various types of admissions that colleges use, how to order transcripts, as well as create a practice Common Application.  This is also a question/answer session for the students.  We also have students complete the post-test which checks for understanding of the material covered.  
 
This project typically becomes a test grade for the student in their English class  We will provide our grade sheet that shows how a final grade is obtained.
 
The audience will be allowed to have a question and answer session.  
 
Resources will be available electronically.
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Career Development
College Readiness
Information Technology
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 15:30–16:45, Magnolia CD
Presenter Name(s)
Lynne Watts
Target Audience
Elementary
Abstract

Every student can develop their leadership qualities.  Through this interactive training, learn a series of lessons that incorporate the Seven Leadership Traits identified by Stephen Covey.  For each leadership trait a sample lesson plan, books to use, plans for evaluation and follow-up as well as activities to use will be included.  

Description

Learning to be a Leader:  Lessons that Empower Students

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will review the leadership traits outlined by Stephen Covey.
  2. Participants will experience some empowering lessons that address the traits of leadership. 

Learning to be a Leader:  Lessons that Empower Students 

Identify the Seven Leadership Traits and how to use them in schools: 5 minutes

  • Classroom lessons
  • Groups
  • School Initiatives and themes

Leadership Trait #1 Be Proactive-Be Prepared-10 minutes

            Recommended Books:

                        Mom, What if I Don’t Want to Go to School?  By Michelle Lautanen

                        The Day the Earth Was Silent by Michael MGuffee

                        Simon’s Hook by Karen Gedig Burnett

                        Wyatt the Wonder Dog Goes to Kindergarten by Lynne Watts

            Activities/Game:

                        Use Problem situation cards as part of the lesson

   Plan for Evaluation and Follow-up

                        Students create a personal checklist to prepare for school each day

                        Counselor reviews checklists at next lesson

Leadership Trait #2:  Begin with the End in Mind-10 minutes- includes group interaction for Card Game Race

            Recommended Books:

  • Annie’s Plan by Jeanne Kraus
  • Have You Filled a Bucket Today?  By Carol McCloud
  • What if Everybody Did That? By Ellen Javernick
  • Wyatt the Wonder Dog Learns to be Organized by Lynne Watts

Activities/Game: 

  • Card Game Race-
  • Marshmallow Test

Plan for Evaluation and Follow-up

  • Each student creates a schedule
  • Counselor checks for successful implementation of schedule at next lesson

Leadership Trait #3 Put first things first- -10 minutes

            Recommended Books:

                        Wyatt the Wonder Dog Learns about Good Manners

                        Wanted a Best Friend by A. M. Monson

                        Who Moved my Cheese for Kids by Spencer Johnson M.D.

            Activities:  Large Jar Visual: http://youtu.be/6_N_uvq41Pg

 Plan for Evaluation and Follow up

  • Students create a list of priorities and place on a 10 point scale
  • Students review list of priorities and implementation at next lesson

 Leadership Trait #4 Think win/win 10 minutes-includes group interaction-Cup Stacking Game

            Recommended Books: 

                        Wyatt the Wonder Dog Learns about Mindset by Lynne Watts

                        The Meanest Thing to Say by Bill Cosby

            Activities/Games:Cup Stacking Game-

Plan for Evaluation and Follow-up

            Students create a comparison chart for growth vs fixed mindset

            Students review ways they demonstrated a growth mindset

Leadership Trait #5:  Seek first to understand, then to be understood-10 minutes-includes group interaction-Reba & Ambler

            Recommended Books: 

                        Amazing Grace Mary Hoffman/Caroline Birch

                        Spaghetti in a Hot Dog Bun by Maria Dismondy

                        Hooway for Wodney Wat by Helen Lester

                        Wyatt the Wonder Dog Learns about Friendship, by Lynne Watts

            Activities/Games:  Reba and Ambler Activity

            Plan for Evaluation and Follow up

                        Students role play situations where differences are recognized and appreciated

                         Students identify ways that they have demonstrated an appreciation and acceptance                             of diversity

Leadership Trait # 6: Synergize: Cooperation and Collaboration-10 minutes

            Recommended Books: 

                        Wyatt the Wonder Dog Learns about Cooperation, by Lynne Watts

                        Wanted: Best Friend, A. M. Monson

            Activity/Games: The Marshmallow Challenge

Plan for Evaluation and Follow up

                        Students role play situations where cooperation is difficult but necessary

                        Students identify ways that they have demonstrated cooperation and collaboration

Leadership Trait #7:  Sharpen the Saw (Always be a Learner)-10 minutes

            Recommended Books:

                        The dot by Peter H. Reynolds

                        Ish by Peter H. Reynolds

                        If I Were in Charge of the World by Judith Viorst

           

Activities:

                        Draw Yourself as A Superhero

                         Draw a heart or a coat of arms and fill in what you would like to learn about

Plan for Evaluation and Follow up

                        Students identify areas where they would like to expand their knowledge

                        Students identify specific ways they can increase their knowledge

Total minutes:  75 minutes

 

 

 

 

 

           

           

 

 

           

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Social Emotional Learning
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 15:30–16:45, Magnolia A
Presenter Name(s)
Crystal Jordan, M. Ed., NCC
Target Audience
Secondary
Abstract

From Kahoot and Poll Everywhere to Padlet and Remind, attendees will walk away with ways to incorporate teen friendly technology into their core curriculum lessons for a more engaging and impactful session. Live demonstrations of the ease of use will take place with an opportunity to... 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
ASCA Model
College Readiness
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Information Technology
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 15:30–16:45, Room 306
Presenter Name(s)
Andre Prospere
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Applying executive functioning skills is a viable means of developing strong character traits in students. It also supports a holistic goal of overall achievement. This presentation will focus on how introducing and reinforcing these skills in P12 students through a group counseling intervention can help bolster academic achievement. Handouts containing more specific information will be provided.

Description

Executive functioning skills are personal attributes that will assist individuals in all areas of life. Specific skills can vary depending on the area of work, school or extra-curricular activity one is dealing with. However, one thing that is certain is that these proficiencies are a vital part of most encounters that individuals confront. As it relates to academia and academic achievement, there are a variety of executive functioning skills that students can and should develop that may prove beneficial in helping them achieve a certain level of success when it comes to their schoolwork.

 

In this presentation, a number of executive functioning skills that can be presented through small group enrichment sessions to high school students will be introduced. The ultimate goal of the interventions is to improve academic achievement by reinforcing and cultivating these skills that all students ideally already possess. The presenter will first speak about what executive functioning skills are compared to hard skills are and why each is necessary for any gjiven situation. The presenter will then address these same ideas specific to the field of education and being a student. He will then lay out a time table as well as an outline of the proposed intervention, identifying at least 5 of the most relevant executive functioning skills to the field of education and discuss how and why they will be beneficial to the student’s academic success. After this, dialogue will be encouraged between the presenter and the audience, gathering information and ideas that will help to strengthen the proposed intervention. Handouts highlighting these most relevant skills, documented research and other pertinent information will be made available for seminar participants.

 

Depending on the level of knowledge that the audience members possess around executive functioning skills, the focus of this presentation may fluctuate between discussions of executive functioning skills, their benefits to students and the actual planned intervention. This should allow for all parties involved to gain a thorough understanding of the intervention and its objective.

After this conference, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify at least 3 executive functioning skills that will support increased academic achievement.
  2. Describe one way in which any executive functioning skill will benefit students.
  3. Distinguish between an executive functioning skill and a hard skill as it relates to academic achievement.
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academics
Personal/Social
Academic Achievement
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 15:30–16:45, Ballroom DE
Presenter Name(s)
Lauren Peavler
Target Audience
Secondary
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

Information on the scholarship process, applying for scholarships and keeping existing scholarships.

 

Description

During this presentation, attendees will learn about college funding resources, such as scholarships, grants, and other forms of financial aid.  The presentation will help keep high school counselors invested in the process of supporting their student’s scholarship initiatives. In addition, the presentation will also inform counselors on how to encourage students to build and personalize a Scholarship Portfolio and turn it into their own strategic marketing tool.  Key topics of discussion include:

  • Types of scholarships
  • Partners in the process
  • Preparing a scholarship portfolio
  • A strategic approach
  • Keeping your scholarship
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
College Readiness
Presenters
Ms. Lauren O Peavler, Discover Student Loans
Thu 8 Nov, 2018 15:30–16:45, Room 303
Presenter Name(s)
Stefanie Hassing, Denise Lenares-Soloman, Ph.D.
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

This presentation is aimed to provide school personnel and educators information regarding the increased risks and needs for the LGBT+ population between the ages of 10-19 and how to address them.  These include suicide awareness and prevention, drug use, Safe Zone environment training, advocation steps that can be done within the classroom and the school, as well as state laws and regulations regarding sexual orientation protections called “safe schools laws”.

Description

The presentation will cover various points of LGBT+ adolescent population needs that differ from general population within the educational environment.  This includes increased risk for suicide, substance use, depression, anxiety, self-harm, increased bullying, safety issues, and increased sexual risk-taking.  Protective factors and risk factors for this population are addressed, particularly that of a supportive or unsupportive environment and how it can affect a LGBT+ student within a learning environment.

Advocacy and social justice opportunities for the classroom, school and community will also be covered. 

There will be various opportunities for participation, including discussion, questions, and Q & A. 

Supplemental resources will be provided, primarly for Georgia but some nationwide resources and crisis information, via handout.  Information from the AFSP, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, will also be handed out per request. 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Presenters
Stefanie Hassing, Augusta University
Dr. Denise Lenares-Solomon, Augusta University
Fri 9 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Room 309
Presenter Name(s)
Ariel Gordon, Ed.S.
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Designed through an ecological lens, this longitudinal intervention prepares eighth grade students for a successful and meaningful high school experience. Eighth grade students participate in a Spring Book Drop, a Summer Transition Camp, and a Peer Mentoring Program that runs throughout 9th grade. This program fosters engagement, builds teacher and peer relationships, improves literacy, reduces stigma, and increases student confidence. Additionally, ninth grade students display improved grades and increased enrollment in Advanced and AP courses.

Description

This project shares innovative ideas for faciltating a successful high school transition among eighth grade students. Implemented in four phases, this longitudinal intervention begins in the Spring of eighth grade and sustains positive outcomes throughout a student's high school experience. The scope of this intervention is designed through an ecological lens with the intention of fostering student engagement, building teacher and peer relationships, improving literacy, reducing stigma, and increasing student confidence. Achievement data from this project displays improved grades and increased enrollment in Advanced and AP courses.

The first phase of this intervention involves upperclassmen applying and interviewing to become peer mentors for ninth grade students for the upcoming academic year. Students are selected and trained on mentorhsip and leadership principles. Their first experience/obligation is to attend Freshman Transition Camp as camp counselors to meet and build initial relationships with freshmen. The goal in this phase is to build leadership capacity and establish program expectations.

From there, the second phase includes building excitement around literacy and establishing early relationships with eighth grade students. Over 1000 books are donated from community donors for a “Book Drop” to take place at feeder middle schools. Titles are chosen for relatable protagonists and then categorized by lexile band. Students select a novel based on their literacy band to continue reading level growth in the summer. Each student must finish their book as their entrance ticket to attend Freshman Transition Summer Camp. The goals in this phase are to excite students to read, reduce summer literacy melt, and begin relationship building at transition camp.

The third phase begins in the Fall of ninth grade and counselors identify struggling ninth grade students. Students are identified based on early Fall progress report grades and they are paired with a trained upperclassman mentor. Mentors and mentees engage in relationship building and academic tutoring once a week during homeroom througout ninth grade. The goals in this phase are to build peer relationships, improve grades, and increase engagement & belonging.

The final phase of this intervention involves progress monitoring of ninth grade students' grades, program management, recruitment of mentors for following year (many mentees become mentors), and encouragement of mentees to enroll in more rigorous courses for the following school year. 

These relationships established in ninth grade create meaningful experiences and lasting bonds throughout high school in addition to improved achievement data. Because mentees become mentors later in high school, the program is self-sustaining and holistic. While this intervention requires the collaboration of many stakeholders for a successful implementation, it can be duplicated in or modified for any school setting.

This presentation will include a powerpoint, student testimonial videos, and a sustainability map handout for participants.

 

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academics
Personal/Social
New Research
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Fri 9 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Room 308
Presenter Name(s)
Presenter 1: Jennifer Branscome, Ph.D.
Valdosta State University
Associate Professor
jbranscome@valdosta.edu
Presenter 2: Katharine Adams, Ph.D.
Valdosta State University
Associate Professor
ksadams@valdosta.edu
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

In this session, an overview of autism spectrum disorder will be provided including diagnosis, etiology, signs, and symptoms. Additionally, best practices and interventions for working with autism spectrum disorder in the PreK – 12 setting will be discussed.

Description

This session has three primary goals: 1. Provide an overview of autism spectrum disorder, 2. Review best practices for working with autism spectrum disorder in the PreK – 12 setting, and 3. Discuss interventions for working with autism spectrum disorders in the PreK – 12 setting. This session is intended to be interactive and audience participation will be solicited. Participants will receive handouts of all presentation materials upon request.

 

Goal 1: Overview of Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Learning Objective: Participants will gain an understanding of the basics of autism spectrum disorder including diagnosis, etiology, signs, and symptoms.
    • Session participants will learn how the DSM-5 is used in the diagnosis of ASD (e.g., age of onset, criteria). Also, participants will learn about current research and information concerning the etiology of ASD. Lastly, participants will learn about signs and symptoms of ASD which may be encountered within the school setting.

 

Goal 2: Best Practices in Working with Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Learning Objective: Participants will gain an understanding of best practices in working with autism spectrum.
    • Session participants will learn about best practices for school counselors when working with students with ASD within the school setting. This will include an overview of issues and concerns related to ASD within the school setting. Also, approaches to working with ASD in the school setting will be addressed. Helpful resources will also be identified.

 

Goal 3: Interventions for Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Learning Objective: Participants will learn about empirically-supported interventions which can be used by school counselors when working with autism spectrum disorder within the school system.
    • Participants will learn about interventions which can be used within the school setting when working with students with ASD. Information on working with parents and teachers will also be discussed. Resources will also be provided.

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academics
Issues in Counseling
Social Emotional Learning
Session Materials
Fri 9 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Magnolia A
Presenter Name(s)
Denise Lenares-Solomon, Ph.D.
Jamie Lewis-Cox, M.S., LAPC
Georgia M. Pritchard, MEd, LPC, NCC
Allegra Renee Boddy, MEd, LAPC, NCC
Margaux H. Brown, Ph.D., NCC
Mrs. Sonya Weaver
Target Audience
Secondary
Abstract

EdS program candidates in the Augusta University Counselor Education Program consulted with a local school to develop a data-driven program modeled after the American School Counseling Association National Model. Students analyzed data, highlighted strengths, problem areas, and made recommendations.

Description

After the session, participants will have more knowledge about creating and developing the ASCA National Model to implement in the school setting as well as have a better understanding of the challenges and advantages of using the national model. Presenters will use powerpoint and handouts to present information to the participants. Following the presentation, participants will be encouraged to ask questions to the presenters.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
ASCA Model
Academics
Graduate Students
Presenters
Georgia M Pritchard, Augusta University
Allegra R Boddy, Augusta University
Mrs. Sonya Weaver, Richmond County School System
Jamie Lewis-Cox, Augusta University
Dr. Denise Lenares-Solomon, Augusta University
Dr. Margaux H. Brown, Ph.D., Augusta University
Session Materials
Fri 9 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Room 312
Presenter Name(s)
Phoenicia L. Grant
Target Audience
Secondary
Post-secondary/Admissions
Abstract

This practice-oriented presentation provides counselors with a foreign transcript evaluation toolkit for working with immigrant and refugee students. When transfer credit is awarded for foreign transcripts, a graduation pathway is forged. Students can bridge past knowledge with present expectations and concentrate on courses needed for graduation. The transcript evaluation framework presented operates within a framework of school and district policies, state laws and regulations and professional ethics standards.

Description

Historically, English language learners (ELLs) have not received equitable educational services and resources (ASCA, 2005).  ELLs are more likely to drop out of school when compared to their English-speaking peers (Z. Sheng, Y. Sheng, & Anderson, 2011). Foreign transcript evaluation allows students to earn transfer credit for classes taken outside the United States. Students can then bridge past knowledge with present expectations and concentrate on courses needed for graduation.

This session will emphasize four learning objectives:

  • Understand various international educational systems.
  •  Obtain an overview of the transcript evaluation framework in order to positively affect the graduation rates.
  • Determine appropriate grade level placement using foreign records.
  • Implement the five cultural competencies of multicultural counseling for English Learners

During this session participants will:

  • Disaggregate data based on the targeted population (e.g., ELs) and the identified concern (e.g., graduation rate decline)
  • Discover how to use data gathered foreign transcripts and educational systems outside the United States to impact instruction
  • Receive information about several educational systems (France, Central American, and United Kingdom)
  • Gain best practices for evaluating foreign transcripts based on Federal and State law and guidance.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Redeliver the foreign evaluation framework
  • Evaluate a foreign transcript using best practices shared in presentation
  • Advocate for appropriate grade level placement for English Learners

Activities:

The workshop includes four activities:

Reflective Think, Pair, Share activity-examine issues in access and equity using article titled, “High School Credits for ELLs Still a Challenge” by Mary Ann Zehr

Essential Questions for Transcript Evaluation Scavenger Hunt activity- work in groups to locate principal information needed to evaluate a foreign transcript using sample transcripts from three educational systems.

Are you Smarter than the Presenter (Formative Assessment) activity- individually find the error(s) on a given transcript evaluation and provide rationale for how error was found.

"The Mission" (Inspired by Mission Impossible) activity - individually evaluate a foreign transcript

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
ASCA Model
Academics
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
New Research
Graduate Students
Career Development
College Readiness
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Ms. Phoenicia Grant, M.Ed., Dekalb County School District
Fri 9 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Magnolia CD
Presenter Name(s)
Morgan E. Kiper Riechel, PhD
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

ASCA’s Ethical Standards includes a 9-step process for ethical decision-making, the first of which is to “define the problem emotionally and intellectually.” Many ignore this important dual step, focusing primarily on the intellectual examination of issues at expense of the counselor’s emotional response, which can be a barometer in decision-making. This session will discuss research in decision-making and provide additional resources for school counselors to consider both the “emotional” AND “intellectual” aspect to ethical decision-making.

Description

At this conclusion of this session, audience members will:

  • Become re-acquainted with Stone’s (2010) Ethical Decision-making model that is included in the ASCA National Model, with an emphasis on the first step, “define the problem emotionally and intellectually.”
  • Understand that a school counselor’s ability to make ethical decisions begins with a sensitivity, both intellectual and emotional, to ethical issues. Subsequent steps in the ethical decision-making model cannot occur without this first step.
  • Become familiar with the literature in embodied decision-making which uses the ethic of care and compassion to understand how our physical, bodily reactions and emotions to the environment can help us understand ethical dilemmas in context better than using our intellect alone. Neither process (intellect or emotion) is sufficient on its own
  • Receive resources and tools to enhance sensitivity to ethical issues using both our intellectual and emotional capacities as professional school counselors.
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
ASCA Model
Issues in Counseling
New Research
Fri 9 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Room 306
Presenter Name(s)
Ken Jackson
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

Counselors are called upon to support all students—including LGBTQ students.  School counselors are fundamentally more aware, competent, and knowledgeable. But is there more?  This program goes beyond the 101 level and explores how we make decisions, and how this looks in real life.  Participants will explore a decision making framework and then apply them to real life scenarios. Bring your challenges and situations as we work together to explore possible counselor responses. 

Description

When it comes to supporting LGBTQ students, counselors have grown in recent years to become more aware and knowledgeable. Many now have a basic level of competency.  They often struggle thought, in how to best implement their support. Real life can be challenging, tricky and blurred. It becomes more difficult if one finds oneself in an unsupportive school community

To give them a framework, participants will examine an LGBTQ Student Action Decision Making Model. They will also look at characteristics and possible responses for three different types of school communities: Hostile, Tolerant, and Affirming.  Participants will then look a real life scenarios and apply the decision making model based on school type

 

Description

The session will cover three areas:

  1. LGBTQ Student Action Decision Making Model- They will look at an approach that I have used for 20 years when consulted about LGBTQ issues in schools. It covers equality, equivalence, and equity.
  2. Participants will review types of school communities (hostile, tolerant, and affirming). These represent the types of schools I have worked in when supporting LGBTQ students. I will give examples and help the participant analyze their own situations.
  3. Scenario discussion- Participants will then discuss real life scenarios—both the ones I bring as examples and ones that they choose to generate. Once we brainstorm these scenarios, they will be grouped. They will then apply the decision making model to the scenario. All of the cases are adapted from real events that have occurred in schools.
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Dr Ken Jackson, Decatur HS/UGA
Session Materials
Fri 9 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Ballroom C
Presenter Name(s)
Robert Rice and Marianna Sullivan
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Abstract

Academic and social emotional success can be challenging for some students and there is an increase in students who engage in self-harming behaviors. Research shows that 14% to 35% of adolescents (ages 14-22) and 8% of children (ages 7 to 16) engage in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) behaviors. Presenters will offer research based interventions and strategies you can use today for helping students of all ages who engage in NSSI find safer coping strategies for success.

 

Description

The DSM-V defines Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) as the deliberate harm or destruction of body tissue without suicidal intent and that is not socially sanctioned (i.e. tattoos and piercings). This injurious behavior may including cutting, scratching, burning, eraser burning, picking, hair pulling or hitting (banging) so as to cause harm to the body. Though this type of non-suicidal behavior has been around for many years, the increase among children and adolescents has become alarming. Early studies showed the incidence of this behavior to be as high as 14 to 35% among high school and college age students. More recent studies show younger trending with as many as 8% of children between the ages of 7 and 16 engaging in NSSI, (Barrocas, Hankin, Young, & Abela, 2012; Fitzgerald & Curtis, 2017).

 

Whether this increase and onset at a lower age is a result of students’ intensified and premature efforts to regulate and control runaway emotions, or constitutes a cry for help, or imitative behavior encouraged from the attention given NSSI by the media, school counselors are often the first to see the effects on our students and our schools. Our response to students who engage in NSSI is necessary and critical. As leaders and mental health advocates, professional school counselors are in a unique position to influence and equip our students, parents, and faculty with the tools to combat this growing crisis. With the adoption of the new ASCA Mindsets’ and Behaviors’ standards for students, the American School Counselor Association has placed additional importance on helping students gain the knowledge and skills to “manage emotions and learn and apply interpersonal skills” ( ASCA Mindsets, 2014). As leaders, professional school counselors can educate administrators, teachers, and parents and advocate for students who struggle with NSSI behaviors.

 

 In this session, the presenters will give a brief overview of NSSI, provide research based interventions appropriate for the school setting, and discuss effective collaboration with clinical mental health professionals. During the session emphasis will be placed on the importance of creating a positive and supportive school climate, engaging parents in partnerships, and educating teachers and administrators with the proper knowledge surrounding students who engage in NSSI.

 

Through a PowerPoint slide show, role play demonstrations, experiential group discussions, and handouts/resources, participants will learn proactive and reactive interventions that can be used in their work as professional school counselors with students who engage in NSSI.

 Learning Objectives

Following the workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Define the differences between suicide and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) behavior.
  2. Define NSSI, types of behaviors, and the relation of NSSI to other conditions.
  3. Determine possible contributors for NSSI behaviors (developmental, biochemical, peer pressures).
  4. Provide respectful and strength based approaches for students who exhibit NSSI behaviors.
  5. Identify several user friendly interventions (proactive and reactive) for use with students who engage in NSSI.
  6. Provide healthy coping strategies (alternatives) for students, and advance follow-up procedures with students who engage in NSSI. 
Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academics
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Marianna Sullivan, M.ED School Counseling, Saint Paul Public Schools, Harding Senior High
Robert E. Rice, Ph D, Georgia State University
Fri 9 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Ballroom A
Presenter Name(s)
Kelli Beechler, Jeri Bryant, Maxine Miller
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Abstract

Learn how Dowell Elementary School implemented Restorative Practices to address school climate, discipline referrals and staff morale. You will learn the research that supports Restorative Practices and how to determine if your school could benefit from implementing this evidence based program.  You’ll walk away with access to materials to share with stakeholders as well as simple and effective practices you can do on a daily basis to make your school more restorative.

Description

Our learning objectives are to teach participants about Restorative Practices and Restorative Circles as well as the guiding philosophy that supports it.  We will include the research that supports the use of Restorative Practices and Circles and its impact on academics, discipline referrals, interrupting the school to prison pipeline, violence prevention, school climate and staff morale. The whole school implementation of Restorative Practice Circles will be reviewed, examples of  resources like Restorative Practice Circle binders and other products will be examined and showcased. Participants will engage in interactive training activities demonstrating how circles are conducted. Participants will learn and practice affective questions and restorative questions; two of the most useful and easy ways to implement parts of Restorative Practices. Participants will walk away with everything they need to discuss and implement Restorative Practices Circles with stakeholders in their buildings.

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
New Research
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Geraldine Bryant, Ed.D., Dowell Elementary School, Cobb County School District
Maxine Miller, M.Ed., Ed.S., Dowell Elementary School, Cobb County School District
Kelli J Beechler, Ed.S., LPC, Dowell Elementary School, Cobb County School District
Fri 9 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Room 303
Presenter Name(s)
John O. Nwosu, Jr., Ed.S.
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Post-secondary/Admissions
Abstract

A coffee shop is the last place many would expect to experience discrimination. The reality is that bias is extensive, pervasive, and persistent. Whether in a classroom or coffee shop, complex systems of implicit bias contribute to people being treated differently for identical behaviors. In this experiential session participants will explore 1.) updates in multicultural/social justice counseling competencies, 2.) the relationship between implicit bias and inequality, 3.) complex systems, and 4.) tools for increasing equity.

Description

After attending this workshop participants should be able to…

  1. Summarize significant changes in the Multicultural and Social Justice Counseling Competencies (2016)
  2. Discuss the relationship between implicit bias and structural inequality
  3. Explain bias from a Networked Ecological Systems paradigm
  4. Use strategies and tools for providing more equitable school counseling programs

Program Outline:

  1. Intro - 3m
  2. Norms & Expectations - 3m
  3. Pre-test - 2m
  4. Values - 7m (Examine aspirational v. actual values and outcome gaps in education and healthcare. Discuss the role of a professional school counselor/purpose of the ASCA Model and their relationship with equity.)
  5. Recent updates in MCSJC Competencies - 30m
    • Intersectionality (Examine the Intersections of social identities)
    • Social Justice (Define Social Justice, Complex Systems of Power, and Implicit Bias. Explore the relationship between implicit bias and systemic inequality.)
    • Action (Discuss ways to increase equity at all levels of a school counseling program by using the ASCA model)
  6. Review - 3m
  7. Post-test - 2m
  8. Triangle, Circle, Square - 3m (Critical reflection activity)
  9. Q&A - 7m

For more information:

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
ASCA Model
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
New Research
Graduate Students
CCRPI
Social Emotional Learning
Fri 9 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Room 310
Presenter Name(s)
Maria Sherrod
Leslie Kollasch
Mesha Bolton
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Abstract

Our students are innundated with technology.  How can we get and keep their attention?  By infusing technology into our lessons . . . of course!  We will show you how we have used program such as Nearpod, Kahoot, ClassFlow and Google Appications to liven up your lessons.  

Description

By the end of this session each participant will:

  • Have ideas on how to use current technology programs in their counseling lessons
  • Have been exposed to various ways to use technology for different purposes and outcomes
  • Have an opportunity to use the technolgy from a student and teacher-pespective

The audience will actively participate in activities using technology.  They will also be given resources on how to make the programs work for their school setting and student population.

 

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Information Technology
Presenters
Leslie Kollasch, Inman Elementary
Mesha Bolton, Sara Harp Minter Elementary School
Fri 9 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Magnolia B
Presenter Name(s)
Peter Vajda, Ph.D.
770-804-9125
7490 Whitmire Rd. Cumming GA 30028
Ph.D. - Education, Cognitive Psychology
Educator, administrator (18 yrs.) NYU, Mercy College (NY), St. Michael's College (VT) and Suffolk County SS(LI, NY), Trainer/Facilitator in areas of Change Management (20 years)
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Post-secondary/Admissions
Abstract

So much of what stands in the way of successful, sustainable change in the academic and counseling world are the perceptions, rationalizations, justifications, excuses and stories we’ve created (as children) that keep us locked in old habits and patterns as administrators, educators and counselors. In this presentation Dr. Peter Vajda shares his knowledge, experience and training of how and why we resist change. Participants explore and share their experiences with resistance to change, and discuss what's holding them back. Together we look at the underlying cause of our resistance. Peter then provides valuable insights, practical exercises and powerful tools to support participants to accept, engage and embrace change from a place of equanimity, serenity and inner peace in their lives at work (and at home, at play and in relationship).

 

Description

Objectives:

 

  1. Understand the mind/intellect alone cannot effect true and real change; the inner wisdom of the heart and body are necessary for change to be lasting and sustainable.
  2. Understand and practice with mindfulness and focusing (right-brain activities) that support one to experience the state wherein one's real and authentic self can show up; the self that is more open and receptive to change
  3. Practice allowing one's fear, accepting one's fear and feeling one's fear in a mindful way that provides the doorway into transformative change and growth

Take aways:

 

  1. When I'm acting as a self-aware, mature, and responsible adult (rather than an unconscious emotionally reactive 4-5-6 year old), and I experience myself in a state of equanimity, inner peace, calm, balance and harmony, I'm more open, accepting, and curious, and less defensive and reactive about change.
  2. I didn't know what I didn't know about how my early-childhood self-limiting and self-sabotaging programming shows up in my adult life.
  3. While the trigger for my reactivity to change may be "out there," the cause of my reactivity is inside me. It's never about "him," "her," "it" or "them."Audience: Those educators, administrators and counselors whose capacity to contribute to, and support, the health and well-being of their campuses, and the performance and productivity of individuals and teams is hampered by their inability or unwillingness to adapt to change. Those professionals who allow their (often self-limiting, often unconscious) hard-wired perceptions, assumptions, beliefs, and "stories" to get in the way of being more committed, engaged, open and accepting of change. Those professionals who overtly or covertly allow their resistance to change to cloud their objective evaluation of events, circumstances, choices and decisions.
  4.  

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Academics
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Career Development
Social Emotional Learning
Fri 9 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Grand Salon
Presenter Name(s)
Nadiya Boyce Rosen, Melissa R. Mecadon-Mann
Target Audience
Elementary
Middle
Secondary
Independent
Abstract

For many students, obtaining mental health counseling services is not possible due to cost, transportation, and documentation/residency concerns. School counselors are often faced with the reality of addressing clinical issues at school in addition to their normal day-to-day responsibilities. This presentation will provide multiple tools and research-based interventions that can be used to plant seeds and foster growth with elementary, middle, and high school students who experience anxiety, depression, and behavioral issues.  

Description

Rationale: As more and more students enter into mental health counseling treatment for trauma-related anxiety, depression, and behavioral issues, the need for school counselors to support these students beyond the clinic has become vital in schools throughout the United States. A common concern among school counselors is the lack of time available to support students in need of long-term counseling treatment. Additionally, many students and families are not able to attain counseling services due to the cost of services, concerns with transportation to and from counseling sessions, and documentation and residency concerns.

Ideally, a school counselor’s primary responsibility is to provide a comprehensive school counseling program for all students covering multiple domain areas including academic, career, and social and emotional development. In reality, school counselors are often tasked with covering these domain areas and school support duties (ex. bus and lunch duty, collaboration with teachers and student support teams to manage RTI, 504s, and IEPs, student aptitude testing, etc.) while also working with students individually and in groups to address behavioral issues, anxiety, depression, and other issues related to trauma. In addition, though many school counselors throughout Georgia and the United States graduate from CACREP-accredited institutions with the training and eligibility to become licensed professional counselors and have the capacity to provide therapeutic assistance to students, there is a lack of self-efficacy regarding the ability to address the mental health needs of students. Nearly one in five children have a mental, emotional, or behavioral disorder, yet only 20% of those students with those needs receive mental health care (CDC.gov). There is a need for greater knowledge of school-wide and group curriculums, online programs, and resources that will allow school counselors to effectively support students without adding to the time constraints that school counselors face on a daily basis.

Objectives/Outcomes: The objective for this presentation is to address the constraints and self-efficacy concerns that school counselors may have by introducing school counselors to online and interactive technology interventions that can be used to help students struggling with anxiety, depression, trauma, and behavioral issues. Viewers and participants will receive theoretically-based resources and classroom and group curriculum that can be used for work with students at the elementary, middle, and high school level.

Opportunities for audience participation: Using Kahoot! (a game-based learning platform) audiences will be able to assess their own knowledge while participating in an engaging and interactive session. Discussion will be encouraged throughout the presentation to identify the pain points and learning edges that participants have experienced in their roles.

Handouts/resources: A handout with a list of resources will be provided for participants to implement with students. Presenters will collect email addresses for further questions and correspondence.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Tools for working smarter, not harder
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Social Emotional Learning
Information Technology
Presenters
Nadiya Boyce Rosen, M. Ed., TBD
Melissa R. Mecadon-Mann, M. Ed., TBD
Fri 9 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Ballroom B
Presenter Name(s)
Lauren Hodges
Dawn Hadley
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Counselor Educator, Supervisor
Abstract

13 Reaons Why became an overnight sensation when Netflix picked it up for a TV series.  The series deals with difficult topics (teen suicide, bullying, rape, alchol and drugs), and left schools scrambling to support students who had read or witnessed these topics where blame was no longer faceless.  ASCA has provided support for the school community and families.  As school counselors, this provides a good opportunity to bridge the gap between home and school.

Description

Fiction collides with our world on a daily basis, and provides us with unique perspectives on difficult topics we would not otherwise have. We can choose to ignore them, or be proactive and embrace these teachable moments.  The Netflix series based on the book 13 Reasons Why has provided an opportunity for the school community and families to support our students with conversations about difficult topics like teen suicide.  

Objectives/Outcomes:

To acknowledge the role that school counselors, teachers, parents and students play in recognizing signs of depression, self-harm/suicide, bullying and sexual assault.

To encourage discussions about difficult topics that face our student populations, but are often ignored because they are "taboo" and/or people feel ill-equipped to address them

To distribute resources from ASCA that help school counselors provide support to teachers and staff, parents and students.

To encourage the school community to embrace teachable moments.

Participants will be asked to share what they know about 13 Reasons Why.  A prezi will guide participants through each of the learning outcomes with specific examples from the Netflix series and how it affects our population of students.  Stigma will be addressed, and misinformation corrected (for example, talking about suicide increases the risks or plants ideas).  Information will also be provided about informing parents about trendy material that appeals to their students, but requires supervision and/or discussion.  We will also discuss how to support families through materials provided by ASCA.

Prezi and Materials will not attach

13-Reasons-Why-Season-1-Discussion-Guide.compressed.pdf
13ReasonsWhyStaffParentsStudents.pdf
AFSP13Reasons-parents.pdf

 

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Dr. Dawn Hadley, Savannah Arts Academy
Lauren Hodges, Savannah Arts Academy
Fri 9 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Room 324
Presenter Name(s)
Avery Bradley
Target Audience
Elementary
Abstract

In our society, there is a growing deficit of interpersonal skills necessary for creating and maintaining strong, life-long relationships. Designed for the Girl Scout Gold Award, the encourageME program utilizes lessons, discussions, and engaging activities to teach older elementary school students these valuable friendship skills. This presentation, given by the Girl Scout behind it all, shares the incredible impact of the program and how it can easily be used within the classroom.

Description

The proposed presentation is centered around the encourageME program, a program designed to promote supportive friendship skills among fourth and fifth grade students. This program was created as a Girl Scout Gold Award project and has been successfully implemented at four elementary schools to date. The presentation learning objective would be to share how to use the program and the program resources within the classroom, as well as what the students will gain from completing the program. As far as audience participation and handouts, the first part of the presentation would replicate the first part of session one of the program. The audience would participate in watching the lesson video, going through the discussion questions, and doing activities that reinforce the lesson. The second half of the presentation would discuss the overview of the program and the student impact, including the valuable skills they gain and how those skills translate later on in their lives. The handouts would be copies of the lesson plan for part one of the four-part program, as well as an information page that includes a link to the website with the remainder of the program materials.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Social Emotional Learning
Presenters
Avery Bradley, Girl Scouts
Fri 9 Nov, 2018 08:30–09:45, Ballroom DE
Presenter Name(s)
Kim Jackson-Allen, Ed.D.
Target Audience
Middle
Secondary
Post-secondary/Admissions
Abstract

Have you ever wondered what was going on in an adolescent’s head or what an adolescent was thinking? If you work with adolescents, then the answer is probably a resounding yes. Believe it or not, there is a reason why adolescents differ from adults in the way they behave, solve problems, and make decisions. This engaging presentation will offer a detailed overview of how we can better understand adolescents and how we interact with them.

Description

Have you ever wondered what was going on in an adolescent’s teenager’s head or what an adolescent was thinking? Do you continue to scratch your head about why they do some of the things they do? If you work with adolescents, then the answer is probably a resounding yes. Believe it or not, there is a reason behind this and the reason is actually a scientific one. Plain and simple, adolescents differ from adults in the way they behave, solve problems, and make decisions. By increasing your sphere of learning about adolescent brain development, you will grasp and better understand their behavior. Through the lens of a professional school counselor, this engaging presentation will change the trajectory of your work with students by:

  1. Helping you to communicate more effectively with teenagers.
  2. Helping adolescents control executive functioning skills.
  3. Helping adolescents develop efficient higher order thinking skills.
  4. Helping adolescents develop effective problem-solving skills.
  5. Helping adolescents regulate their emotions.

Additionally, during this session, participants will have an opportunity to engage in small group activities to dialogue with colleagues and leave with a job-embedded professional learning experience to take back to their school setting.

Please select the interest areas (or track) your proposal covers
Academics
Personal/Social
Issues in Counseling
Academic Achievement
Social Emotional Learning