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Zero Waste and Stormwater - How Do They Connect?
Wed 19 Aug, 2020 08:30–10:00, Room 4add to calendar
Session Description

There are many areas where the worlds of stormwater and zero waste intersect, but many people do not see or know about the connections. Municipalities in California are required to reduce pollutant discharges to rivers, bays and the Ocean. Seeing the connections between these issues and zero waste will help professionals integrate policies and practices for a more sustainable environment in California. This session will use examples of how zero waste and stormwater connect and the linkages to important zero waste and stormwater regulations.

Speakers
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Peter Schultze-Allen, EOA Inc.
Title:
Senior Scientist
Speaker Biography:

Peter has extensive experience with green stormwater infrastructure, litter reduction, zero waste policy, complete and green streets, sustainable landscaping, and urban forestry. He managed the environmental programs for the City of Emeryville from 2002 to 2013 including the City’s award-winning dense, urban and Bay-Friendly GI program. Since joining EOA in 2013, he has been providing GI, LID and litter-related technical assistance and program support to staff around the Bay Area. He is one of the co-authors of Berkeley's Single-use Foodware and Litter Reduction Ordinance. He is a Certified Professional in Stormwater Quality, QSP/QSD, LEED-AP and a ReScape Qualified Professional.

Abstract Title:
Zero Waste and Stormwater - How do they connect?
Speaker Abstract:

There are several areas where the worlds of stormwater and zero waste intersect, but many people do not see or know about the connections. Green Stormwater Infrastructure deals with landscaping, soil, mulch, compost and durable pavement materials that are also pervious - all of these topics have zero waste connections. Litter/trash in stormwater has an immediate link to zero waste policies and programs. The recent focus on foodware source reduction ordinances - moving away from recycling and composting for these materials and other food packaging is another area of connection. Municipalities in California are required to reduce litter/trash flowing into bays, rivers and the Ocean. The design of buildings to reduce waste and litter is an emerging area that I have focused on in the writing of a toolkit for multi-family building design and operation. Seeing the connections between these disciplines will help professionals integrate policies and practices for a more sustainable environment in California. This presentation will use these examples of how zero waste and stormwater connect and the linkages to important zero waste drivers such as AB 341, AB 1826 and SB1383 as well as regional and state-wide stormwater regulations.

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Kim Braun, City of Culver City
Title:
Environmental Programs & Operations Manager
Speaker Biography:

Kim  Braun is the Environmental Programs & Operations Manager for the City of Culver City. She is responsible for collection of all waste, recycling, organics city wide, a 500 TPD transfer facility, street sweeping, stormwater permits and projects and waste water operations.  Kim relocated to Santa Monica in 1997 as the Resource Recovery and Recycling Manager  until 2016.  There she was reposnible for citywide waste collections, a transfer station and street sweeping.  Prior to relocating Kim was the Director of Operations for Mercer County in Trenton New Jersey responsible for a 1200 TPD transfer station and county wide recycling programs.

Abstract Title:
How to Reduce Stormwater Exceedance Levels at Transfer Stations
Speaker Abstract:

The State of California requires industrial facilities to obtain an Industrial Generator Permit and complete a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan annually.  Transfer stations, MRF's, landfills are all required to  obtain these permits and complete reports.  The State requires that these facilities do not pollute the water ways and oceans with  waste materials, oils, lead, phosphates, e-coli and bacteria as well as a list of many other contaminants.  Culver City's Transfer Station is adjacent to Ballona Creek which flows directly to Santa Monica Bay.  Through required sampling, it was determined that our Transfer Station was at a Level 2 Exceedance for polluting the creek and risked the possiblity of huge fines or even a shut down.  Culver City constructed a large stormwater  Project and reduced the Level 2 Exceedance to Compliance.  This workshop is a case study to show participants what it takes to obtain stormwater compliance when waste is our major business.  

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Annette Poliwka
Speaker Biography:

Annette Poliwka is a Zero Waste Commissioner for the City of Berkeley, which recently passed historic legislation on single use disposables. She also is a consultant working on a variety of issues related to zero waste. Her work at the City of San Francisco focused on waste reduction for the commercial sector and legislation research (plastic bag and styrofoam bans). While in New York City at the USEPA, she launched the Trash Free Waters Program. Annette holds an M.S. Environmental Management from USF, and certificates in International Business at Georgetown, and Sustainable Fashion at FIT in NYC.

Abstract Title:
Local Governments Take Lead on Source Reduction
Speaker Abstract:

The City of Berkeley passed its Single Use Disposable Foodware and Litter Reduction Ordinance in 2019. The legislation requires a $0.25 charge on single use cups in addition to requiring reusable food service ware. Annette, in her role as Zero Waste Commissioner, will speak about the importance of source reduction and how the City is implementing the new ordinance. Annette will also speak about her role in advocacy for National Cleanup day to help eliminate litter that ends up in the waterways. While picking up litter is not the solution, it brings awareness to participants about issues related to waste, consumption, and litter.